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Doctor of Physical Therapy Student Handbook

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Academic Year: 2017-2018 

Release Date: 8/1/2017   

Table of Contents

Section I: Program Introduction

Section II: Student Requirements

Section III: Academic Policies

Section IV: Student Professional Behavior Policies

Section V: Other DPT Program Policies (PTRS Policies & Procedures Manual)

Section VI: Student Resources

Section VII: UMB Campus Policies

Section VIII: Clinical Education

APPENDIX

Section I: Program Introduction

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Preamble 

The mission, vision, goals and expected outcomes as well as the academic regulations specific to the entry-level Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program and its curriculum are the responsibility of the collective core faculty. The following handbook, including the regulations and policies contained within, have been developed through the collaborative efforts of the collective core faculty.

Mission 

The Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science (PTRS) advocates for and advances societal health by optimizing wellness and human movement or function through excellence in education, research, clinical practice, and service.

Vision 

  • Graduating culturally competent professionals capable of delivering excellent client-centered clinical care through critical thinking, evidence based practice, and lifelong learning.
  • Providing new knowledge and evidence that enhances rehabilitation science and supports clinical practice through expertise, innovation and technology.
  • Guiding and promoting the physical therapy profession and rehabilitation science through engagement with scientific and professional organizations as well as local, national, and international communities.

DPT Program Goals and Expected Outcomes 

The program will:

  1. Advance the student’s capacity for thinking analytically and critically in spirit of scientific inquiry through facilitated seminars and didactic discussions in the curriculum.
    • Expected outcome: The program will ensure a progression of activities that integrate science and clinical practice throughout the curriculum (didactic content and clinical correlates in Year 1 courses and a minimum of 2 seminars per clinical block).
  2. Contribute to student’s ability to communicate effectively, orally and in writing, with patients families and health care providers through structured clinical learning opportunities (Case Reports, Consultation Projects, and PICO Presentations) in Full Time Clinical Internships I, II, III.
    • Expected outcome: The program will offer a minimum of 3 structured clinical learning opportunities in the form of a Case Report, Consultation Project, and PICO Presentation in Full Time Clinical Internships I, II, or III.
  3. Cultivate a level of clinical competence to provide effective efficient and humanistic heath care in diverse practice settings by offering professional practice opportunities and clinical experiences in a variety of settings for each student.
    • Expected outcome: Every student will be exposed to a minimum of 3 different practice settings as part of clinical experiences.
  4. Expand the student’s ability to appreciate contributions of research through discussion of design, measurement and statistical analysis, as it helps to expand the knowledge base of the physical therapy profession.
    • Expected outcome: Every student will complete a knowledge competency and a knowledge based applications of scientific evidence for clinical practice (CAP and CAT)
  5. Encourage the students’ participation in service and professional activities that promote the advancement of the profession.
    • Expected outcome: The program will facilitate student participation in a minimum of 2 campus and / or community health service and /or professional activities that promote the profession of physical therapy
  6. Promote the student’s ability to create a lifelong plan of continuing personal and professional development through the development of professional portfolio throughout the curriculum.
    • Expected outcome: The program will require that every student will complete a professional portfolio prior to graduation.
  7. Promote the provision of clinical service to the citizens of Maryland upon graduation through clinical care, wellness services, and healthcare advocacy.
    • Expected outcomes: a) At least 50% of the graduates will be licensed to work in the state of Maryland, b) The program will provide a minimum of 3 wellness or healthcare advocacy service opportunities each year for student participation

The faculty will:

  1. Demonstrate excellence in teaching and student evaluation as well as contemporary expertise in areas of teaching responsibilities.
    • Expected outcome: a)100% of the core faculty will demonstrate contemporary expertise in areas of assigned teaching on each block’s teaching evaluations by students and peer assessment and, b) 100 % of core faculty will score an average of very good to outstanding on each block’s teaching evaluations by students and peer assessment
  2. Participate in the development of new knowledge and evidence that enhances rehabilitation science and the profession of physical therapy.
    • Expected outcome: 2a) 50% of core faculty will be engaged in scientific research producing new knowledge and evidence as measured by at least one grant submission and two published manuscripts for these faculty per year, 2b) 100% of core faculty will have an active scholarly agenda with at least one disseminated scholarly product each year
  3. Model commitment to promoting the physical therapy profession and rehabilitation science through engagement in service activities and with scientific and professional organizations in university/local, national, and/or international communities.
    • Expected outcome: 100% of the faculty will be members in either a local, national or scientific professional organization with 50% holding an office, leadership position, or committee membership.

The students will:

  1. Integrate evidence and demonstrate critical thinking to support clinical decision making.
    • Expected outcomes: a) 100% of the students will successfully complete 3 PICO projects with 90% scoring A’s, b) 100% of the students will achieve an “entry-level” score on CPI criterion #7 (clinical reasoning) by end of Full Time Clinical Internship III, c) 100 % of the students will complete a written Case Report with 15% scoring over 90% to qualify for Research Day presentation
  2. Screen, examine, evaluate, diagnose, and provide appropriate interventions for client/patient management across the lifespan.
    • Expected outcome: 100% of the students will successfully meet requirements for PBAs and clinical education with patients across the lifespan.
  3. Demonstrate clinical competence in a minimum of 3 practice settings, which include medically complex, rehabilitation, and community based settings.
    • Expected outcome: 100% of the students will achieve passing scores on the CPI for each Full Time Clinical Internship (I-III).
  4. Communicate effectively, orally and in writing, with patients’ families and health care providers.
    • Expected outcomes: a) 100% of the students will successfully complete the Consultation Assignment in Full Time Clinical Internship I, II, III, b) 100% of students will successfully complete patient communication requirements for CQM (tester and patient feedback)
  5. Participate in service and other professional activities that promote the advancement of the physical therapy profession
    • Expected outcomes: a) 100% of the students will participate in at least one service related activity prior to graduation, b) 75% of the students will attend at least one local or national professional conference by graduation, c) at least 3 students in each class will hold an active position in a professional organization (student representative, committee member), d) 100% of the students will be members of at least 1 professional organization at the local, national or international level
  6. Demonstrate the ability to design a professional portfolio to guide lifelong learning and development
    • Expected outcome: 100% of the students will successfully complete a comprehensive personal development portfolio by the end of the program

 

The graduates will:

  1. Function as an entry-level independent point of entry provider of physical rehabilitation and rehabilitation services.
    • Expected outcome: NPTE first time passage rate will be 90% or higher. NPTE final passage rate will be 100%.
  2. Effectively manage care for persons in medically-complex, rehabilitation, and community-based settings
    • Expected outcome: 90% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the graduate outcome survey, and 95% of respondents will score at or above entry-level at the 6-month graduate and employer outcome surveys.
  3. Autonomously practice in a variety of healthcare environments
    • Expected outcome: 90% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the graduate outcome survey, and 95% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the 6-month graduate and employer outcome surveys
  4. Provide guidance and interventions to promote wellness and prevention and to enhance the physical performance of persons in the community
    • Expected outcome: 90% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the graduate outcome survey, and 95% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the 6-month graduate and employer outcome surveys
  5. Effectively communicate orally and in writing with patient/families, colleagues, other health care professionals and the general public
    • Expected outcome: 90% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the graduate outcome survey, and 95% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the 6-month graduate and employer outcome surveys
  6. Contribute to the management of physical therapy services, administration and marketing strategies, and fiscal responsibilities within a practice setting
    • Expected outcome: 90% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the graduate outcome survey, and 95% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the 6-month graduate and employer outcome surveys
  7. Initiate a plan of lifelong learning and continuing competence
    • Expected outcomes: a) 90% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the graduate outcome survey, and 95% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the 6-month graduate and employer outcome surveys, b) 100% of respondents will have attended at least 1 continuing competence activity by the 6 month graduate outcome survey and 2 continuing competence activities by the 18 month graduate outcome survey
  8. Participate in service and / or professional activities that advance the profession of physical therapy
    • Expected outcomes: a) At least 50% of the respondents will be members of the APTA and /or a professional organization, b) 20% of the respondents will be active in some service activity and/ or professional committee/ work task force.
  9. Use evidence as a basis for critical thinking , decision-making and independent practice (can include journal club participation, literature reviews, case studies and reports).
    • Expected outcome: 90% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the graduate outcome survey, and 95% of respondents will score at or above entry-level on the 6-month graduate and employer outcome surveys.

DPT/MPH Dual Degree Option Goals and Expected Outcomes 

In addition to all DPT Program Goals and Expected Outcomes, the DPT/MPH dual degree option has the following additional goals and expected outcomes:

The DPT/MPH dual degree option will:

  1. Prepare students to apply and integrate classroom training in a public health practice environment
    • Expected outcome: The Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science will collaborate with the Department of Epidemiology to provide MPH core and concentration courses
  2. Expand the student’s ability to infuse a population health perspective into critical analysis of health issues
    • Expected outcome: The dual-degree option will ensure mentorship for a public health capstone project

The DPT/MPH dual degree option students will:

  1. Integrate evidence and demonstrate critical thinking to support public health
    • Expected outcome: a) 100% of the students will successfully complete a capstone experience on a supervised project in their area of specialization, b) a three-year average of 50% of completed capstone projects eligible for publication

The DPT/MPH dual degree option graduates will:

  1. Participate in service and / or professional activities that advance the profession of public health
    • Expected outcome: a three-year average of 50% of graduates will engage in a governance committee within the public health venue on a 6-month graduate outcome survey
  2. Graduates will infuse population health perspective into their professional careers
    • Expected outcome: a three-year average of 50% of respondents will report strongly agree or agree to infusing population health into their career on a 6-month graduate outcome survey

DPT Curriculum Overview 

The Doctor of Physical Therapy program is a three-year curriculum beginning in the summer of the first year. The curriculum is integrated through the use of “blocked” courses (blocks), multidisciplinary team teaching, and integrated patient content.

The first year of the program begins with a systems-oriented approach to the foundational sciences and is followed by instruction in the performance of clinically relevant, system-specific and age-appropriate examination and intervention skills. The first year includes two blocks of Professional Issues. The first year also includes integration experiences designed to highlight clinical relevance and critical thinking as well as seminars for Evidence-Based Practice.

The second year of the program introduces the knowledge, skills and clinical decision making necessary for medically complex settings, inpatient and outpatient care settings, and focused instruction in musculoskeletal and neuromuscular disorders. There is exposure to underserved patient populations, an additional block of Professional Issues, and Seminars for Evidence-Based Practice. Woven throughout this year are integration labs for independent practice, heightened patient exposure, and integrated clinical education (ICE) to facilitate synthesis of all information presented thus far in the curriculum. Prior to entering the third academic year, students must successfully pass Clinical Qualifying Measures, which encompasses summary competencies and skills.

The third year is dedicated to 33 weeks of practical experience in a variety of clinical and non-traditional settings, subdivided into three separate clinical internships. These opportunities are back-loaded in the curriculum to enable the student to possess all needed skills to examine, evaluate, diagnose, and intervene appropriately for primary, secondary, and tertiary physical impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities.

Throughout the curriculum the specific block content is determined by:

  1. the goals and threads of the curricular plan,
  2. feedback from clinicians and students,
  3. The Guide to Physical Therapist Practice and,
  4. current literature on physical therapy teaching and practice.

 

Block Descriptions 

Year 1 

DPTE 511: Basic Sciences I
Basic Sciences I provides a study of the morphology of the human body including the macro-anatomy (gross anatomy), microanatomy (histology) of the basic tissues, and provides an introduction into the mechanisms of diseases. It includes the study of the bones, ligaments, muscles, nerves, blood vessels, and their associated organs. Emphasis is placed on the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems. Consideration is given to clinical entities, by including imaging and clinical cases. Formal lectures, laboratory experiences (including cadaver dissections, observation of radiographs, and microscopy sessions) are supplemented by required reading, CD-ROM material and web-based resources. [9 SCH]

DPTE 512: Professional Issues I
Professional Issues I focuses on the orientation of the student to the Department of Physical Therapy and the American Physical Therapy Association policies and procedures. This orientation is designed to insure student compliance with all departmental, university, and professional regulations and guidelines for conduct. As such, the student will be completing many of the administrative tasks necessary for enrollment as a full time student. Lectures, discussions of the Maryland Physical Therapy Practice Act and self-directed exercises on the Guide to Physical Therapy Practice will provide the opportunity for the student to examine the ethical and professional issues surrounding physical therapy practice and conduct as a student in this program. Extemporaneous speaking and computer laboratory sessions with PowerPoint software will give the student the skills to prepare and give professional presentations that can contribute to the body of physical therapy knowledge. [3 SCH]

DPTE 513: Basic Sciences II
Basic Sciences II provides an integrated “systems-oriented” approach to the morphological and developmental organization of the human body. Integrated study of neuroanatomy, embryology, histology, physiology, pathology and pharmacology is employed in this block to prepare students for the rest of the professional curriculum. Formal lectures, laboratory experiences, and clinical correlation conferences, supplemented by required readings are used to help students gain mastery of the essential concepts of these foundational sciences. Each of the body’s major organ systems will be studied beginning with structural and functional aspects of individual cell types and progressing to tissue and systems levels. Basic pathology, pathophysiology, and system-related pharmacology are addressed before moving to each new subject area. The interdependence of structure and function of tissues and organs is emphasized throughout the lifespan. The block faculty includes basic and clinical scientists as well as physical therapy clinicians. [15 SCH]

DPTE 514: Basic Sciences III
Basic Sciences III integrates and consolidates the foundations of movement sciences and bio-physical sciences pertaining to human function across the life span. It will serve as an interface between the previous basic science blocks and the clinical sciences blocks. Students will acquire knowledge in the application of biomechanical and patho-mechanical correlates and motor behavior theories to the analyses of movements in health and pathology and use this knowledge to develop basic screening, evaluation, assessment and performance measures and skills. They will develop the basic skills of documenting and reporting the findings of the studied evaluation measures and intervention outcomes. The student will learn to describe, operate and apply skillfully various therapeutic technologies used in habilitation and rehabilitation of patients with musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, cardio-pulmonary, vascular, and integument deficits. Instruction will foster critical thinking and an evidence-based approach to problem solving skills necessary for developing effective and efficient independent clinicians. Lectures, laboratory activities, numerous case presentations and problem-based learning will be used in this block. Successful mastery of the material presented in the block will be measured through performance on written and practical examinations. [12 SCH]

DPTE 515: Professional Issues II
Professional Issues II prepares the student to communicate and appropriately interact with other health care providers, third party payers, patients, clients, and their families. Educational experiences will include panel discussions with professionals in rural, community, teaching, and research settings. A visit to the APTA headquarters is scheduled to demonstrate the role of the national organization in physical therapy legislation and practice. Extensive exercises in documentation and ethics will provide the student with a foundation to communicate clinical decisions and conduct themselves professionally to other health care professionals, patients, clients, and their caregivers. [2 SCH]

Year 2 

DPTE 520: Medical Issues
Medical Issues provides the student with knowledge of common medical and surgical conditions that present throughout the lifespan. The hospital clinical practice setting will serve as the introductory benchmark for instruction and will highlight, compare and contrast the variety of settings reflective of patient acuity – emergency room, intensive care unit, transitional care unit and general medical/surgical units. A portion of this block is dedicated to the comprehensive understanding of the etiology and management of congenital, traumatic and acquired pathological amputations. Clinical wound management practices are outlined for multiple types of open wounds, burns and common dermatologic disorders. Lectures, laboratory exercises, clinical visits and independent learning modules will assist students to master clinically relevant information. Practical learning experiences include analysis of laboratory and medical/surgical data, patient co-morbidities/risk factors, resource availability and information gained through interdisciplinary professional interactions. Students will also gain exposure to evidence-based practice through interactive dialogue in research seminars. [12 SCH]

DPTE 522: Musculoskeletal I
Musculoskeletal I addresses orthopedic injuries of the spine and lower extremities. Learning experiences include lectures, laboratory sessions, real and simulated patient cases, in addition to small group discussions that focus on clinically relevant examination and management techniques of persons throughout the lifespan. This block includes critical examination, communication, and effective documentation for appropriately managing persons with orthopedic injuries and diseases. Weekly laboratory and seminar sessions assist the student to understand the evidence supporting the concepts presented during the block and integrate these concepts into independent practice. [7 SCH]

DPTE 523: Integrated Clinical Experience I
Integrated Clinical Experience I introduces students to the clinical environment in order to practice their clinical skills under direct supervision of a clinical instructor. Students have the opportunity to apply didactic knowledge, develop professional behaviors, and practice hands-on skills. [1 SCH]

DPTE 524: Neuromuscular I
Neuromuscular I covers the advanced study of neurological disorders of the central, sympathetic, and peripheral nervous systems across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving and integrating the examination skills and intervention skills covered in previous courses to help students further develop their skills in establishing and executing a comprehensive plan of care for the neurological population. This course introduces skills for the identification and critique of evidence to support clinical practice and training in decision making to develop the skills necessary for independent practice with neurologic patient populations. [7 SCH]

DPTE 525: Musculoskeletal II
Musculoskeletal II addresses orthopedic injuries of the spine and upper extremity. Learning experiences are based on lectures, laboratory sessions, real and simulated patient cases, as well as via small group discussions that focus on clinically relevant examination and management of persons throughout the lifespan. This block includes critical examination, communication, and effective documentation for appropriately managing persons with orthopedic injuries and diseases. Weekly laboratory and seminar sessions assist the student in understanding the evidence supporting the concepts presented during the block and for integrating these concepts into independent practice. [7 SCH]

DPTE 526: Integrated Clinical Experience II
Integrated Clinical Experience II provides students the opportunity to practice their clinical skills in a clinical environment under direct supervision of a clinical instructor. Students have the opportunity to apply didactic knowledge, develop professional behaviors, and practice hands-on skills. [1 SCH]

DPTE 527: Neuromuscular II
Neuromuscular II continues the advanced study of neurological disorders of the central, sympathetic and peripheral nervous system across the lifespan. Course emphasis is on problem-solving and integrating the examination and intervention skills covered in previous blocks to facilitate the development of competency in establishing and executing a comprehensive plan of care for the neurologic population. Concepts presented in Neuromuscular Block I will be built upon, especially the identification and critique of evidence to support practice and clinical decision making necessary to function as an independent practitioner. Small group seminars further skills in critique of evidence to support clinical practice. [7 SCH]

DPTE 530: Clinical Qualifying Measures
Clinical Qualifying Measures (CQM) is a multifaceted process wherein student professional growth, development and skills are assessed in a triangulated fashion. Students, peers, faculty and simulated patients provide data that is reviewed in composite to ascertain student readiness to proceed to the full-time clinical internship phase of the curriculum. CQM includes a simulated patient encounter. Prior to the simulated patient encounter, students engage in active learning techniques to help synthesize and integrate information gained throughout the didactic phase of the curriculum. Emphasis is on clinical problem-solving, prioritization and use of evidence-based strategies. [1 SCH]

Year 3 

DPTE 528: Professional Issues III
Professional Issues III focuses on how to manage, market, and act as a supervisor in a physical therapy practice. This block incorporates information on billing, reimbursement, applying and interviewing for a job, staff development, productivity, quality improvement, legal issues of physical therapy practice, and practice and program marketing. In addition, students learn to apply these principles to their clinical decision making and professional interactions with other health care providers, third party payers, patients, clients, and their caregivers. Learning experiences include guest lectures, mock interviews, billing cases, role playing, and small group discussions. A block project is assigned to simulate a marketing plan for a community based wellness program. This project integrates concepts of wellness, communication, and use of web-based technology addressed in previous blocks. [4 SCH]

DPTE 545: Full Time Clinical Internship I
In this first in a series of three full-time internships, students are provided the opportunity to apply didactic knowledge, develop professional behaviors, and practice patient/client management in a clinical setting. Students perform all aspects of the patient-client management model, including: examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and plan-of-care, documentation, delegation, legal and financial issues related to physical therapist practice. The internship is 11 weeks in length. [10 SCH]

DPTE 546: Full Time Clinical Internship II
In this second full-time internship, students are provided the opportunity to continue to apply their didactic knowledge, develop professional behaviors, and practice patient/client management in another clinical setting. Students perform all aspects of the patient-client management model, as described in DPTE 545. The internship is 11 weeks in length. [10 SCH]

DPTE 547: Full Time Clinical Internship III
In this third, and final, full-time internship, students are provided the opportunity to continue to apply their didactic knowledge, develop professional behaviors, and practice patient/client management in another clinical setting. Students performa all aspects of the patient-client management model, as described in DPTE 545. The internship is 11 weeks in length. [10 SCH]

DPT/MPH Dual Degree Option Curriculum Overview

The Doctor of Physical Therapy-Master of Public Health (DPT/MPH) Dual Degree program is a four-year curriculum. The curriculum begins in the summer of the first year and includes a foundational science and professional issues course from the DPT program. The fall and spring of the first year incorporate core and concentration courses in one of the following selected specialization areas: community & population health, epidemiology and global health from the MPH program.

The second year begins with completion of electives within the MPH program. The fall and spring of the second year includes a systems-oriented approach to foundational sciences and is followed by instruction in the performance of clinically relevant, system-specific and age-appropriate examination and intervention skills as well as a second professional issues course within the DPT program.

The third year includes knowledge, skills and clinical decision making necessary for medically complex settings, inpatient and outpatient care settings, and focused instruction in musculoskeletal and neuromuscular disorders. Prior to entering the fourth academic year, students must successfully pass Clinical Qualifying Measures, which encompasses summary physical therapy competencies and skills.

The fourth year begins with a final professional issues course. The summer, fall and spring of the fourth year requires 33 weeks of practical physical therapy experience in a variety of clinical and non-traditional settings, subdivided into three separate clinical internships. These opportunities are back-loaded in the curriculum to enable the student to possess all needed skills to examine, evaluate, diagnose, and intervene appropriately for primary, secondary, and tertiary physical impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities. The final year also culminates in a capstone requirement related to the area of specialization within the MPH program. For detailed descriptions of the DPT Blocks refer to the DPT Curriculum Overview section. For detailed descriptions of the MPH courses refer to the Master of Public Health website at: http://www.medschool.umaryland.edu/epidemiology/mph/Current-Students/Student-Resources/

Special Circumstances Block for Remediation and Reintegration 

DPTE 532: Individualized Academic Preparation Plan (IAPP)
This block is taken to fulfill the requirements for an IAPP. See the subsequent section titled: “Re-Entry following Academic Failure” for additional details. The IAPP block is designed to provide activities and experiences to support the student in remediating deficiencies and/or maintain knowledge/skills in order to successfully return to the curriculum and continue academic progression. When the student is on IAPP, they will have to register for this block each semester that the IAPP is required (refer to Appendix for IAPP enrollment form). The number of credits will be reflective of individual circumstances and the block specific activities. The IAPP course is not available for first year students.

Curricular Threads 

  1. Clinical/Patient Relevance
    This thread has a focus on clinical practice application and includes topics such as: clinical decision making and application, ICF Model (3 domains and the 2 modifiers), patient values/ family and person centered care and ethical and legal practice.
  2. Communication (written, electronic, oral, etc.)
    This thread looks at communication globally and combines documentation, professional interactions and giving and receiving feedback from former threads. This thread is a broad communication thread that includes: health informatics (broad range of clinical practice documentation, rules for use of electronic media (social networking), HIPAA considerations, professional interactions (written, electronic and oral), feedback (giving, receiving, and self-assessment).
  3. Cultural Competence and Individual Differences
    This thread focuses on culturally competent practice and interactions as well as attention to individual differences. It broadly includes: ethnicity, gender ID, religion, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, disability status, learning differences, health disparities, and other personal and environmental factors.
  4. Evidence Based Practice
    This thread focuses on didactic and practical content that develop student skills in evidenced based clinical practice such as: ability to search, find, analyze/ interpret and apply current best evidence from the literature for clinical practice decisions, ability to apply clinical experience as evidence for clinical practice decisions, ability to incorporate the values of the patient/family in consideration of current best evidence in clinical practice decisions, and the ability to contribute to the existing evidence.
  5. Lifespan Orientation
    This thread focuses on considerations of developmental changes across the lifespan that impact clinical practice such as: infancy, childhood, adolescence, adult, and older adult
  6. Prevention, Health Promotion, Fitness, and Wellness
    This thread focuses on the topics of prevention, health promotion, fitness and wellness applied to the following parties: individual, group, and community/society.
  7. Technology
    This thread focuses on the emergence and use of technology not only related to clinical practice but in the educational setting as well. It includes the following: diagnostic, therapeutic, educational, and application (knowing appropriateness for application).

DPT Curriculum Schedule 

Year 1

Summer  Fall  Spring 
Basic Sciences I
(DPTE 511)
9 credits
 
Professional Issues I
(DPTE 512)
3 credits
Basic Sciences II
(DPTE 513)
15 credits
Basic Sciences III
(DPTE 514)
12 credits
 
Professional Issues II
(DPTE 515)
2 credits

 

Year 2

Summer  Fall  Spring 
Medical Issues
(DPTE 520)
12 credits
 
 


 
Musculoskeletal I
(DPTE 522)
7 credits
 
Neuromuscular I
(DPTE 524)
7 credits
 
Integrated Clinical Experience I
(DPTE 523)
1 credit
Musculoskeletal II
(DPTE 525)
7 credits
 
Neuromuscular II
(DPTE 527)
7 credits
 
Integrated Clinical Experience II
(DPTE 526)
1 credit
 
Clinical Qualifying Measures
(DPTE 530)
1 credit

 

Year 3

Summer  Fall  Spring 
Professional Issues III
(DPTE 528)
4 credits
 
Full Time Clinical Internship I
(DPTE 545)
10 credits
Full Time Clinical Internship II
(DPTE 546)
10 credits
Full Time Clinical Internship III
(DPTE 547)
10 credits

 

 

DPT/MPH Dual Degree Option Curriculum Schedule

Year Summer Fall Spring
1st Year
  • DPTE 511: Basic Sciences I

  • DPTE 512: Professional Issues I
Community & Population Health
  • Core Courses: PH 600, PH 648, PH 610, PH 621, PH 668

  • Concentration Courses: PREV 758
Epidemiology
  • Core Courses: PH 600, PH 648, PH 610, PH 620, PH 668

  • Concentration Courses: PREV 619
Global Health
  • Core Courses: PH 600, PH 648, PH 610, PH 621, PH 668

  • Concentration Courses: PREV 749
Community & Population Health
  • Core Courses: PH 623

  • Concentration Courses: PREV 625, NURS 732, PH 735, Approved Electives 1 credit
Epidemiology
  • Core Courses: PH 623

  • Concentration Courses: PREV 659, PREV 720, PREV 803, PREV 601, Approved Electives 1 credit
Global Health
  • Core Courses: PH 623

  • Concentration Courses: PREV 613, PREV 625 or NURS 732, PREV 664, Approved Electives 1 credit
 
2nd Year
  • Approved Electives 6 credits MPH
  • DPTE 513: Basic Sciences II
  • DPTE 514: Basic Sciences III

  • DPTE 515: Professional Issues II
 
3rd Year
  • DPTE 520: Medical Issues
  • DPTE 522: Musculoskeletal I

  • DPTE524: Neuromuscular I

  • DPTE 523: Integrated Clinical Experience I
  • DPTE 525: Musculoskeletal II

  • DPTE 527: Neuromuscular II 

  • DPTE 526: Integrated Clinical Experience II

  • DPTE 530: Clinical Qualifying Measures

 
4th Year
  • DPTE 528: Professional Issues III

  • DPTE 545: Full-Time Clinical Internship I
  • DPTE 546: Full-Time Clinical Internship II 
  • DPTE 547: Full-Time Clinical Internship III 
MPH Capstone

NOTE: Gray shaded areas are the MPH coursework from the DPT/MPH Dual-Degree Option.

Organizational Structure of the Department 

Chair of the Department 

The Chair of PTRS guides and directs the vision for the educational and research programs. The Chair represents the department to all external communities and entities on the local, national and international level. The Chair interfaces with the Dean of the School of Medicine and other University Officers to advocate for the program, its current needs and future projections.  

Rogers_Mark

  • The Department Chair is Dr. Mark Rogers

Department Administrator 

The Administrator supervises the overall financial and administrative functions of the department including developing and implementing all budgets, as well as managing and administering grants, contracts, pre-award and post-award activities related to research. The Administrator also provides supervision for all administrative staff and human resources functions. Policies and procedures are developed by the Administrator to assure a cohesive and effective teaching and research program.

SACK_KAREN 2 

  • The Department Administrator is Ms. Karen Sack

Director of Academic Affairs 

The Director of Academic Affairs is responsible for operational block activities including assignment of block leaders, coordination of blocks and evaluating teaching coverage needs. The Director will also establish the academic calendar and oversee the admissions committee.

Horn_Linda 

  • The Director of Academic Affairs is Dr. Linda Horn

Director of Clinical Education 

The Director of Clinical Education has the primary role and responsibility to develop, coordinate, administer, and evaluate the clinical education portion of the academic program. The Director also is the faculty member who is responsible for determining student grades for the Clinical Education blocks that occur in the second and third year of the curriculum. The Director maintains communication with students during their clinical internships and with the clinical supervisors and staff at partnering facilities.

Neely_Carrie 

  • The Director of Clinical Education is Dr. Laurie Neely

Director of Educational Affairs 

The Director of Educational Affairs is responsible for educational program development and compliance, curricular mapping and ensuring the educational program is CAPTE compliant. The Director also oversees the SOM annual report and the curriculum coordinating committee.

McCombe Waller_Sandra 

  • The Director of Educational Affairs is Dr. Sandy McCombe Waller

Director of Faculty and Student Affairs 

The Director of Faculty and Student Affairs is responsible for developing, implementing and monitoring adherence to academic policies and procedures. The Director also will develop and monitor IAPP’s, academic accommodations and have oversight of the academic advancement committee.

GORDES_Karen 

  • The Director of Faculty and Student Affairs is Dr. Karen Lynn Gordes

Director of Instructional Technology 

The Director of Instructional Technology is responsible for the management of technological service and support to all faculty, staff, and students within the department in areas of Information Technology and Audio-Visual Technology. The Director actively works with administration, along with faculty, staff and students to plan for present and future technology initiatives so that the program is equipped to achieve its educational, research and service objectives.

 

  • The Director of Instructional Technology is Mr. Jeff Hawk

Director of PhD Program 

The Director of the PhD Program administers the PTRS terminal degree in Physical Rehabilitation Science, which appeals to scientists from physical therapy and other disciplines. The Director also guides the joint DPT/PhD degree, in a curriculum that combines both the entry-level DPT and the terminal PhD degrees. The department has ongoing cutting-edge research focused mainly on neuro-motor control and rehabilitation and the director is integrally involved in obtaining, conducting and administering grant funding for this research.

Whitall_Jill 

  • The Director of the PhD Program is Dr. Jill Whitall

Director of Student Services 

The Director of Student Services advises current and prospective students on admission processes, campus resources for academic success, and serves as the liaison for campus offices, such as Financial Assistance, Records, Counseling Center, Student Accounting, and the Student Health Center.

 

  • The Director of Student Services is Ms. Nicole Willhide.

DPT Academic Services Specialist 

The DPT Academic Services Specialist plans and coordinates professional and administrative activities related to operational aspects of the program. The Academic Services Specialist is a point of contact for block-related activities, such as Blackboard postings, lab maintenance, room scheduling, proctoring examinations and providing resources. The Academic Services Specialist also assists with textbook ordering, coordinating Block events and compiling the post-block evaluation data.

 

  • The DPT Academic Services Specialist is Ms. Aynsley Hamel

DPT Executive Administrative Coordinator 

The DPT Executive Administrative Coordinator plans, coordinates, and oversees a variety of professional and administrative activities related to the efficient day to day operation of the department. The Coordinator reports directly to the Chair and provides executive administrative support to the Chair, department leadership team, and the department administrator.

 

  • The DPT Executive Administrative Coordinator is Mrs. Donna Bethke

Core and Adjunct Faculty 

For the educational process of the DPT Program to be effective, a team of highly professional educators with varied practice and research backgrounds work to teach and mentor students. A balance of academic and professional preparation among the academic and clinical faculty members is important for a stable, productive, and complementary faculty to function and develop. The faculty should serve as role models in the community, the Department, the institution and the profession through their active involvement with University of Maryland Baltimore (UMB) and American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) committees and boards, as well as through community events that highlight physical therapists as health care providers.

The faculty forms the basis of academic experiences and guidance for students and represents many years of clinical, educational and professional experience. There are two designations for faculty: core and adjunct. Core faculty represents the fundamental teaching unit of the program. All core faculty at PTRS are doctorally prepared and participate in ongoing development of teaching and assessment skills. The faculty to student ratio is optimal so that students have access to core faculty in the classroom, labs, and offices. Students are encouraged to get to know core faculty and establish relationships that will form the basis of professional interactions during and after their professional education.

Adjunct faculty are non-core faculty that assist with teaching in the program by delivering both didactic and laboratory teaching. Having adjunct faculty is a distinct advantage at PTRS, in that adjuncts represent a wide arrange of clinical expertise, can provide mentoring opportunities and are established professional role models.

Block Leaders 

Block Leaders are core faculty with the responsibility of organizing and administering each block in the curriculum. This responsibility includes determining the schedule for activities within the block, the faculty who teach within the block, and the reporting of grades based on student performance during the block according to guidelines outlined in the syllabus. Each block syllabus designates the block leader and students should communicate with the block leader regarding the block.

Committees 

The following committees support the processes of the PTRS DPT educational program: Admissions Committee, Academic Advancement Committee (AAC), Curriculum Coordinating Committee (CCC) and the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education Committee (CAPTE).

  • Admissions Committee: The admissions committee, which is chaired by the Director of Academic Affairs, is charged with oversight of the EDPT physical therapy admissions process including implementing the admission process, developing admissions criteria and making decisions related to admission offers. Other committee members include 2 additional faculty members appointed by the Chair for 3 year renewable terms of service.
  • AAC: The AAC, which is chaired by the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs, provides recommendations to assist student academic advancement within the DPT program. Other committee members are ad hoc members and are selected based upon their clinical expertise and relevance to the particular student issue.
  • CCC: The CCC, which is chaired by the Director of Educational Affairs, is responsible for oversight of the DPT physical therapy curriculum including decisions related to mandated and non-mandated curricular topics. Other committee members include the Director of Clinical education as a standing member of this committee, four additional faculty members, 3 appointed by the chair and one voted at large member, each of which will have 3 year-renewal terms of service.
  • CAPTE: The CAPTE Committee, which is chaired by the Director of Educational Affairs, is responsible for monitoring all aspects of program compliance with the standards established by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) and is responsible for all required self-study or assessment reports. Other committee members include the Director of Clinical Education, the Director of Instructional Technology and the Departmental Administrator as standing members. Two additional faculty committee members are appointed by the Chair for 3 year renewable terms of service.

Research and Professional Interests of the Core Faculty 

The Department is committed to foster research and scholarship in a broad array of topics pertinent to physical therapy. The interests of the faculty represent basic, applied and clinical research applicable in a variety of practice areas related to physical therapy.

Odessa Addison Utilizing lifestyle interventions (such as diet and exercise) to improve muscle and mobility function in older adults with co-morbid conditions.
 
Gad Alon (emeritus) Electrotherapy; management of pathological movements
 
Vincent Conroy Human anatomy with specific interest in the role anatomical variations has on differential diagnosis; service learning; performing arts; geriatric rehabilitation
 
Robert Creath The study of movement initiation in Parkinson's disease (PD) and the control of balance during stepping in the elderly.
 
Cara Felter Influence of different physical therapy interventions on children and adults with neurological disorders, specifically: functional electrical stimulation and psychosocial aspects of rehabilitation for spinal cord injury
 
Roy Film Validation of clinical prediction rules, spinal manipulation and peripheral joint manipulation and exercise in conjunction with cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic low-back pain
 
Karen Gordes Distance education; interdisciplinary education, role of physical therapy in public health issues (i.e., obesity)
 
Linda Horn Balance and vestibular rehabilitation in adults, and fall prevention in older adults
 
Victoria G. Marchese Development of pediatric oncology objective physical function outcome measures; assessment of physical therapy intervention for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lower-extremity sarcoma; pediatric cancer survivorship and the complexities of long-term physical activity
 
Sandy McCombe Waller Intra-cortical inhibition and excitation with unilateral and bilateral training; recovery and neuroplasticity of the central nervous system with bilateral training of the upper extremity post-stroke
 
Laurie Neely Balance and neurologic rehabilitation in the adult population, Evidence based practice in the acute care setting, interdisciplinary education, local and international healthcare disparities
 
Mary Rodgers (emeritus) Rehabilitation biomechanics, functional performance and neuromuscular mechanisms
 
Mark Rogers Interaction of neuro-motor, biomechanical, and behavioral processes that control human balance and movement and their disorders in aging and adults with chronic functional limitations due to central nervous system (CNS) damage such as Parkinson’s disease and stroke
 
Douglas Savin Neuro-motor control and motor learning in nondisabled individuals and persons with stroke and hemiparesis; particularly in the use of motor adaptation to improve the safety and function of persons whose mobility is compromised by disease and/or increased fall risk
 
Kelly Westlake Understanding the neural mechanisms of recovery after stroke with the overall goal of developing targeted and novel interventions to optimize motor learning in this population
 
Jill Whitall Sensory motor development and rehabilitation related to children with developmental coordination disorders and adults with stroke, particularly, novel interventions in both UE and LE paradigms with the goal of understanding the mechanisms of recovery and learning how to optimize the interventions across different levels of impairment

 

Departmental Policy
As a member of the American Council of Academic Physical Therapy which is a component of the American Physical Therapy Association, the University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy requires all of its students, faculty members, and associates to abide by the APTA Code of Ethics found at http://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Policies/Ethics/CodeofEthics.pdf. Among other things, this code requires physical therapists to avoid conflicts of interest that would interfere with the therapist’s professional judgment and requires physical therapists to act in the best interests of their patients/clients over the interests of the physical therapist.

Among other things, this code requires physical therapists to avoid conflicts of interest that would interfere with the therapist’s professional judgment and requires physical therapists to always act in the best interests of their patients/clients over the interests of the physical therapist.

Potential Hazards
There are potential hazards for physical therapy students in the educational environment that include but are not limited to slips and falls, overexertion and musculoskeletal injury.

Additionally, there are potential hazards for physical therapy students working in the clinical environment that include but are not limited to exposure to blood borne pathogens, hazardous chemicals, slips and falls, as well as overexertion and musculoskeletal injury.

 

Section II: Student Requirements

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Essential Requirements for Admission, Academic Advancement and Graduation 

The goal of the University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science (PTRS) is to graduate competent physical therapists. The Admissions Committee exercises judgment on behalf of the faculty to select the entering class, and to consider character, extracurricular achievement, and overall suitability for the physical therapy profession based upon information in the application, letters of recommendation and personal interviews. Applicants and students will be judged not only on their scholastic achievement and abilities, but also on their intellectual, physical, emotional, and behavioral capacities to meet the essential requirements of the program’s curriculum.

Physical therapy education requires the accumulation of scientific knowledge be accompanied by the simultaneous acquisition of skills and professional attitudes and behavior. All courses in the curriculum, including ongoing self-directed learning, are required in order to develop essential knowledge, attitudes and skills required to become a competent physical therapist.

Graduates of the doctor of physical therapy program must have the attitudes, knowledge and skills to function in a broad variety of clinical situations and to render a wide spectrum of patient care. PTRS acknowledges Section 504 of the 1973 Vocational Rehabilitation Act and PL 101-336, the American with Disabilities Act (ADA), but maintains certain minimum technical standards that must be present in the prospective candidate and enrolled student in the DPT program.

As per UMSOM policy, “any student who is not yet a matriculant must make requests for accommodation of disabilities within one week after accepting admission to the Department. Any matriculating student who becomes aware of a disability requiring accommodation, or of need for accommodation of a previously known disability, must request the accommodation as soon as the need for accommodation has been identified.”
http://www.medschool.umaryland.edu/osa/handbook/ 

PTRS will consider for admission and continued academic advancement any individual who demonstrates the ability and capacity to perform the skills referred to in this document. Deficiencies in knowledge base, judgment, integrity, character, professionalism, attitude, and demeanor, which may jeopardize safety or compromise the educational process, may be grounds for block failure and possible dismissal.

PTRS students with disabilities must meet the same essential functions and technical standards as non-disabled students, either with or without reasonable accommodation. In accordance with applicable federal and state laws regarding disabilities, PTRS is committed to make reasonable accommodations for any qualified individual with an identified disability. An applicant who is otherwise qualified will not be disqualified from consideration solely due to a disability. It is the responsibility of the applicant or student to disclose the disability to the University if reasonable accommodations are potentially needed. PTRS has designated the campus Office of Educational Support and Disability Services to receive disclosures from students and applicants about disability and engaging in the preliminary process for documenting a disability and determining reasonable accommodation.

Please contact the office via the on-line form or email:

http://www.umaryland.edu/disabilityservices
Deborah Levi
Office of Educational Support and Disability Services
SMC Campus Center 621 W. Lombard Street, Room 317 Baltimore, MD 21201 410-706-5889 - dlevi@umaryland.edu 

Disability Disclosure and Reasonable Accommodations Form:
https://cf.umaryland.edu/disabilityservices 

Hearing impaired - Maryland Relay Service 711 in Maryland or 800-735-2258 elsewhere.

Aptitudes, Abilities and Skills 

The following aptitudes, abilities, and skills are required of each applicant and student to participate in the educational curriculum at PTRS; this list is by no means exhaustive.

  1. Observation: A student must observe with functional use of vision, hearing, touch, and other somato-sensations. Standards include:
    • - Observation of movement patterns performed by fellow students, patients, simulated patients, caregivers, volunteers, and faculty.
    • - Observation of activities and behaviors demonstrated by fellow students, patients, simulated patients, caregivers, volunteers, and faculty.
    • - Observation of signs indicating patient or simulated patient status, such as: color and temperature of skin, soft tissue, wounds, respiratory rate, heart rate, heart and lung sounds, muscle tone, facial expressions, tone and volume of voice.
    • - Reading information from course materials, patient medical record, diagnostic tests, and equipment.
    • - Monitoring dials, displays and parts of equipment related to patient care, clinical environments, and classrooms.
  2. Communication: A student must be able to communicate in a professional manner in written, verbal and non-verbal forms. Standards include:
    • - Professional communication with fellow students, faculty, staff, patients, caregivers, health care team members and the public.
    • - Obtaining and recording patient history, evaluation and plan of care.
    • - Reporting orally and in writing using the English language to fellow students, faculty, staff, patients, caregivers, health care team members and insurance companies.
    • - Responding to verbal and written communications from fellow students, faculty, staff, patients, caregivers and other health care team members.
    • - Participating in student, curricular and community group activities.
    • - Initiate communications with fellow students, faculty, staff, patients, caregivers and other professional disciplines.
    • - Applying teaching principles for caregiver or simulated caregiver psychomotor skill development to manage patients, simulated patients and faculty in educational and clinical activities.
  3. Physical Performance Skills, Coordination, and Function: A student must have mobility, coordination, gross and fine motor skills. Standards include:
    • - Gross Motor Skills 
      •    *Ability to lift, push, pull and carry patients, simulated patients and equipment necessary for educational and clinical activities.
      •    *Ability to generate and apply force (strength and power) with all body parts necessary for educational and clinical activities.
      •    *Adequate joint and soft tissue range of motion and flexibility to perform educational and clinical activities.
      •    *Applying timely reactions to maintain safety of patients, simulated patients, caregivers and equipment necessary for educational and clinical activities.
      •    *Applying body mechanic principles to maintain safety of self, fellow students, patients, simulated patients, caregivers and equipment necessary for educational and clinical activities.
    • - Fine Motor and Coordination Skills 
      •    *Applying performance skills to safely examine fellow students, patients, simulated patients and equipment necessary for educational and clinical activities.
      •    *Applying performance skills to safely manage and perform therapeutic interventions with fellow students, patients, simulated patients and equipment necessary for educational and clinical activities.
      •    *Utilizing hand dexterity for safe fellow student, simulated patient, patient, caregiver and equipment management as required for educational and clinical activities.
  4. Cognition: A student must have the requisite cognitive abilities necessary for timely problem solving, safety judgment, and reasoning in educational and clinical settings. Standards include:
    • - Measurement, calculation, analysis, comprehension, integration, and synthesis of a large body of knowledge.
    • - Assimilation and comprehension of information from written sources such as textbooks, published literature, internet, and presentations.
    • - Utilization of a variety of verbal, non-verbal, and electronic communications.
    • - Self-assessment of performance to continually improve professional skills.
    • - Integration of cognitive with psychomotor skills.
    • - Utilization of critical thinking skills and creation of effective solutions in all aspects of the program.
  5. Behavioral and Social Attributes: A student must possess maturity, emotional health, and physical abilities required to fulfill all responsibilities in educational and clinical settings. Standards include:
    • - Recognition and demonstration of respect for cultural, spiritual, ethnic, ethical, and value differences among faculty, students, staff, patients, caregivers, and other health care professionals.
    • - Effective harmonious relationships with diverse populations.
    • - Participation in collegial productive group and team activities.
    • - Demonstration of professional behaviors that protect the safety and well-being of fellow students, faculty, staff, patients, simulated patients, and caregivers.
    • - Management of personal stress that may be physically, emotionally, or intellectually challenging in a timely professional manner.
    • - Ability to tolerate physically taxing workloads.
    • - Demonstration of flexibility and adaptability to changing situations and uncertainty.
    • - Maintenance of personal hygiene at all times.
    • - Adherence to timeliness and attendance requirements.
    • - Transportation and access to curricular on-campus and off-campus locations and activities.
    • - Performance of emergency procedures such as CPR and Basic First Aid.

Reporting of Changes in Health Status/Physical Condition 

It is the responsibility of the student to inform the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs and the current Block Leader(s) of any change in his/her health status or physical condition that occurs after entry into the program, that affects the student’s ability to fully perform the Aptitudes, Abilities and Skills identified by the program as necessary for all enrolled students.

If a student is requesting accommodations for their change in health status/physical condition, the student must submit a completed and signed Statement of Physician/Healthcare Provider Form (see Appendix) to the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs. In addition, the student must contact the Office of Educational Support and Disability Services. The Office of Educational Support and Disability Services is located in Room 329 of the SMC Campus Center at 621 Lombard Street. The office phone number is: 410-706-5889.
Website: http://www.umaryland.edu/disabilityservices.

An Educational Access Representative will meet with the student, review any medical or health-related documentation presented by the student, receive the student’s request for accommodations and assist the student in developing ADA accommodations that can be recommended to the program. After the requested accommodations have been approved, notification will be given to the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs. The student will be responsible for arranging a meeting with the current block leader(s) to discuss how accommodations will be incorporated into block activities.

Students must resubmit requests for accommodation to the Office of Educational Support and Disability Services each semester. When appropriate documentation of continued accommodation is approved by Educational Access, it will be forwarded to the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs. The student will be responsible for arranging a meeting with the current block leader(s) to discuss how accommodations will be incorporated into block activities.

In the case a student has a change in Health Status/Physical Condition that affects the student’s ability to fully perform the Aptitudes, Abilities and Skills identified by the program, for the student to return to full participation in the didactic and/or clinical education curriculum as outlined by the Aptitudes, Abilities and Skills requirements, the student must submit a completed and signed Medical Clearance Form (see Appendix) to the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs and the block leader(s). Any student with an illness that results in three consecutive missed days will be considered as a having a change in health status and will be required to complete a medical clearance form for return to full participation in the didactic and/or clinical education curriculum.

Faculty Non-Medical Treatment of PTRS Students 

Due to legal and liability concerns, PTRS faculty are prohibited from providing physical therapy services to PTRS students. If a student is injured or has a condition that requires physical therapy examination and treatment, the student should make an appointment with a physician or external physical therapist. If care is urgently required, the student should visit the Emergency Room, Immediate Care, or Student Health Services. Upon request, faculty may recommend an external physical therapist practice with expertise in the student’s injury/condition. It is the student’s responsibility to follow up on any such recommendation. The recommendation should not be viewed as an endorsement by the University.

Maintaining Current Contact Information 

Students are required to update any change of name, address, and phone number in SURFS, the Student UseR Friendly System: http://www.umaryland.edu/surfs/ Students are required to maintain current demographic information on file in the student database beginning with official entry into the program until 18 months post-graduation.

To access SURFS, enter both your student identification (ID) number (this number begins with @ and is NOT your social security number) - and your personal identification number (PIN). The first time you login to SURFS, your PIN will be your birth date in the format mmddyy. When finished, click Login. If you need help with your login, such as you forgot your password, go to the website and click on “Click here for help with login.”

Background Checks 

Any clinical training site may screen students in the same manner in which the site screens employees. Students may be required to have an additional health examination, be tested for drugs or be fingerprinted for a criminal background clearance before beginning clinical placement. Students who cannot pass the clearance requirements for clinical placement sites may not be able to fulfill the essential requirements needed to obtain a DPT degree.

Section III: Academic Policies

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Revisions to Academic Policy 

Students must adhere to any revisions made to academic policy. The revision date will be clearly stated on the front of the Student Handbook and posted on the departmental website. Students are encouraged to review the Handbook every year to be familiar with PTRS policies.

Grading System 

Symbol  Quality Points  Definition
A 4 Excellent mastery of the subject; outstanding scholarship
B 3 Good mastery of the subject; good scholarship
C 2 Acceptable mastery of the subject; usual achievement expected
I 0 Incomplete. This grade is given when the student has not met all criteria for completion of the course but is currently in process with an outlined plan to complete the outstanding material(s) or performance demonstration. The Incomplete must be converted to a grade within six weeks by the student submitting satisfactory work to complete the requirements of the block. The Incomplete grade will remain on the official transcript, but will not be used to calculate GPA (e.g. I/B). However, if satisfactory completion does not occur within the six week time frame, the “I” will be converted to an “F” grade.
F 0 Failure to understand the subject; unsatisfactory level of performance.
NM 0 No Mark. This grade is given when work has been completed but the instructor is unable to complete the final evaluation and grade calculation for some reason. This grade is removed from the transcript after the calculation is complete.
WP 0 Withdrawal Pass from a single block or semester blocks. Dropping courses may be done only under special circumstances and with approval of the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs. Student must be in good academic standing at the time of withdrawal.
WF 0 Withdrawal Fail from a single block or semester blocks when student is not in good academic standing at the time of withdrawal.
P/F 0 Pass/Fail indicates satisfactory or unsatisfactory completion of the block requirements. This grading will be used only in those blocks designated by the department.

Students are not provided extra credit projects or extra work opportunities during the block for purposes of “pulling up” their grades. In addition, no curves are provided to exam grades.

 

Written Examinations 

Passing Requirements 

An average score of 70.00% for all written examinations in a block is required in order to pass the block. Likewise, if a block weights examinations, the weighted average for all written examinations must be 70.00%. Failure to achieve an average score of 70.00% for all written examinations in a block will result in failure and inability to proceed in the curriculum.

Testing Requirements 

  1. Examinations will be given only in the scheduled rooms, unless advanced arrangements have been made with the instructor. Students should plan to arrive in the test area five minutes before the examination starting time.
  2. Upon completing the examination, the student must leave the examination room and the halls adjacent to the examination rooms.
  3. Take home examinations are to be done independently, unless otherwise specified by the instructor. No discussion of test question strategy, length of answers or resources should be discussed by any students.
  4. The student must meet all testing day guidelines, which include:
    • Leave all coats, bags, books, papers, headphones, cell phones (cell phones must be powered down) and other electronic devices (powered down, with the exception of your electronic testing device for electronic exams) in the front of the room.
    • No talking, sharing of answers or looking at the exam of another student is permitted and, if done, is a violation of the Honor Code. See subsequent section, titled: “Student Professional Behavior Policies, Honor Code and Rules of Conduct” for complete details on the Honor Code.
    • Do not leave the exam room prior to completing your exam. Failure to complete an exam prior to departing the testing space will result in forfeiture of a grade for the exam. Exception is provided for restroom use (as monitored by the proctor), with only 1 student permitted use of the restroom at a time. 
    • Spread out across the room, leaving at least one seat between you and the next person. If you fail to do this, you may be asked to move.
    • The exam proctor will not answer questions during the exam.

Student Procedures for ExamSoft Exams 

The following student actions:

  • Failure to download an ExamSoft exam by the established deadline
  • Failure to notify the Director of Instructional Technology of issues with downloading an ExamSoft exam prior to the established download deadline
  • Failure to bring an ExamSoft compatible computer to the exam testing session

Will result in a professionalism violation notice (PVN) for first occurrence across the curriculum, a 10% reduction in exam grade for the exam associated with the event for the second occurrence across the curriculum, and a forfeiture of exam score for the exam associated with the event for a third occurrence across the curriculum.

Students will be provided a single sheet of paper and allotted a single writing instrument (i.e. pen or pencil) during written exam testing sessions. Students are required to return the single sheet of paper, whether they did or did not utilize the paper, with their name identified on the paper to the exam proctor prior to their departure from the exam room. Failure to return the single sheet of paper will be considered an honor code violation.

Make-Up Examinations 

With the exception of a medical/family emergency, an examination (written or PBA) may only be made up with prior approval from the block leader and or Director of Faculty and Student Affairs. Instructors may require written justification in the case of an emergency (e.g. a doctor's note). Failure to take a scheduled examination, outside of the above guidelines, may result in a grade of “zero” for the exam.

Written Exam Review Guidelines 

Students are encouraged to attend the examination review sessions held after the exam as indicated in the block schedule. At the conclusion of each exam review session, for paper exams only, the exams, grade sheets and scantrons must be returned to faculty/staff, failure to do so is a violation of the Honor Code. See subsequent section, titled: “Student Professional Behavior Policies, Honor Code and Rules of Conduct” for complete details on the Honor Code. Examinations will not be available for review outside of the time scheduled within the block unless there is a specific need, which should be approved by the block leader and/or the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs.

The student must meet all exam review guidelines, which include:

  • Leave all coats, bags, books, papers, headphones, cell phones and other electronic devices (with the exception of your electronic testing device for electronic exams), writing utensils (pens, pencils, highlighters, etc.) in the front of the room.
  • Students attending the exam review session are not permitted to leave until the exam review session has been completed.

Student Procedures for ExamSoft Exam Reviews

  • Failure to bring the same ExamSoft compatible computer (that you took the exam with) for the exam review will result in student’s forfeiture to review the exam associated with the exam review 
  • No late admittance will be permitted to the exam review

Performance Based Assessments (PBAs) 

Passing Requirements 

  1. All PBAs must be passed in order to pass a block.
  2. A score of 70.00% is required to pass a PBA on the first attempt.
  3. If a PBA is not passed on the first attempt, the student must re-test the PBA.
  4. For the re-test, the student will need to:
    • Perform the failed skills from the first attempt and achieve a score of 75.00% or greater.
      • - If the original failure was a full PBA failure, the re-test will comprise all sections of the original PBA
      • - If the original failure was the result of a safety error, the re-test will comprise all sections of the original PBA
      • - If the original failure was a partial section failure, the re-test will comprise the sections failed
    • Complete a new PBA of a comparable skill set and achieve a score of 70.00% or greater.
      • - If the original failure was a full PBA failure, the comparable new skills test will comprise all sections of the original PBA.
      • - If the original failure was the result of a safety error, the comparable new skills test will comprise all sections of the original PBA.
      • - If the original failure was a partial section failure, the comparable new skills test will comprise the sections failed.
    • If the re-test PBA criteria is met, a grade of 70.00% will be recorded for purposes of calculating final grades. If the re-test PBA criteria is not met on the second attempt, it will result in failure of the block.
  5. If a student in a second year DPT course fails to meet the passing requirements on their first attempt of a re-test PBA, the following will occur based on the criteria listed below for students in their second year of the program:
    • If the student has no other Interim Block Notices (IBN’s) in the current block for written exams/PBA’s and ≤2 IBN’s for written exams/PBA’s across the curriculum, the student will be provided the option for remediation via a learning plan developed by either the block leader and/or other identified faculty member(s).
      • - The remediation plan must be completed and passed within 6 weeks from the scheduled end date of the block.
      • - The remediation plan will include a minimum of three testing cases (original case, re-test case, and new case). In order for a student to pass the remediation plan, the student must obtain:
        1. 80% on first attempt for the original PBA case
        2. 75% on first attempt for the re-test PBA case
        3. 70% on first attempt for a new PBA case of comparable skill set
      • - If the failed re-test was for the final PBA for the block, the student will earn a grade of “I” until the remediation is passed. If the remediation is not passed, the student will achieve a failing grade for the block. If the re-test PBA criteria is met, a grade of 70.00% will be recorded for purposes of calculating final grades.
    • If the student has an IBN in the current block for a written exam/PBA and ≤ 10 IBN’s for written exams/PBA’s across the curriculum, the student will earn an “F” for the block and will be provided the option to complete an Individualized Academic Preparation Plan (IAPP) to return to the program.
    • If the student has ≥ 11 IBN’s for written exams/PBA’s across the curriculum, the student will be dismissed from the program.

Testing Requirements 

PBAs may be completed in groups or individually, according to the block design. Regardless of the design, students are not to discuss the case, the requirements, the reason for points lost or "tips" for answering a certain instructor once the exam has begun. A student that has completed testing should leave the testing area immediately. Since the testing may continue for a long period of time, a student without other classes is advised to leave the building. If a student is at risk for failure of the Block, a second tester/observer will be present during the re-test PBA.

Standardized Patient Encounter 

Passing Requirements 

  1. The standardized patient encounter must be passed in order to pass the block.
  2. A score of 80.00% is required to pass the standardized patient encounter on the first attempt.
  3. If the standardized patient encounter is not passed on the first attempt, the student must re-test the standardized patient encounter.
  4. For the re-test, the student will need to:
    • Perform the failed skills from the first attempt and achieve a score of 85.00% or greater.
      • - If the original failure was a full failure, the re-test will comprise all sections of the original encounter
      • - If the original failure was the result of a safety error, the re-test will comprise all sections of the original encounter
      • - If the original failure was a partial section failure, the re-test will comprise the sections failed
    • Complete a new standardized patient encounter of a comparable skill set and achieve a score of 80.00% or greater.
      • - If the original failure was a full failure, the comparable new skills test will comprise all sections of the original encounter
      • - If the original failure was the result of a safety error, the comparable new skills test will comprise all sections of the original encounter
      • - If the original failure was a partial section failure, the comparable new skills test will comprise the sections failed
    • If the re-test PBA criteria is met, a grade of 80.00% will be recorded for purposes of calculating final grades.
  5. If a student fails to meet the passing requirements on their first attempt of a re-test PBA, the following will occur based on the criteria listed below:
    • If the student has no other Interim Block Notices (IBN’s) in the current block for written exams/PBA’s and ≤2 IBN’s for written exams/PBA’s across the curriculum, the student will be provided the option for remediation via a learning plan developed by either the block leader and/or other identified faculty member(s).
      • - The remediation plan must be completed and passed within 6 weeks from the scheduled end date of the block.
      • - The remediation plan will include a minimum of three testing cases (original case, re-test case, and new case). In order for a student to pass the remediation plan, the student must obtain:
        1. 90% on first attempt for the original PBA case
        2. 85% on first attempt for the re-test PBA case
        3. 80% on first attempt for a new PBA case of comparable skill set
      • - If the failed re-test was for the final PBA for the block, the student will earn a grade of “I” until the remediation is passed. If the remediation is not passed, the student will achieve a failing grade for the block. If the re-test PBA criteria is met, a grade of 80.00% will be recorded for purposes of calculating final grades.
    • If the student has an IBN in the current block for a written exam/PBA and ≤ 10 IBN’s for written exams/PBA’s across the curriculum, the student will earn an “F” for the block and will be provided the option to complete an Individualized Academic Preparation Plan (IAPP) to return to the program.
    • If the student has ≥ 11 IBN’s for written exams/PBA’s across the curriculum, the student will be dismissed from the program.

Written Assignments 

Passing Requirements 

  1. All written assignments and projects must be passed in order to pass a block and proceed in the curriculum. Specific grading criteria for passing will be outlined by the faculty providing the assignment.
  2. A 70.00% grade is required to pass the assignment/project on the first attempt. If the assignment/project is not passed on the first attempt, the student must repeat the assignment/project (within the timeframe established by the Block Leader or instructional faculty) and earn a grade of 75.00%. If passed, a grade of 70.00% will be recorded for purposes of calculating final grades. If the assignment/project is not passed on the second attempt, it will result in failure of the block.
  3. An individual written assignment or project may be a requirement of more than one block. If a shared block assignment ultimately earns a non-pass grade, it will result in failure of all blocks wherein it is contained. If the block failures solely reflect the non-pass grade earned on the written assignment or project, the failures will count as only a single penalty (failure) relative to matriculation standards. If the block failures reflect substandard performance on additional assessment categories (i.e., written examinations, PBAs, etc.), the blocks will be counted individually as distinct failures and matriculation standards will be applied.

Late Assignment Policy 

Failure to submit an assignment by the posted deadline will result in a 10% reduction immediately from the assignment grade and an additional 10% for each calendar day past the assignment due date. In the event an assignment is not submitted due to student’s absence, reductions in assignment grade will be based on the alternative assignment due date established by the block leader in coordination with the Director of Faculty & Student Affairs. 

Testing Modules 

Passing Requirements 

  1. All testing modules must be passed in order to pass a block and proceed in the curriculum.
  2. The specific passing rate for a testing module will be outlined by the faculty providing the testing module. The number of attempts provided to achieve the passing score will be outlined by the faculty providing the testing module.

Lab Worksheet 

Passing Requirements 

  1. All lab worksheets must be passed in order to pass a block and proceed in the curriculum.
  2. The specific grading criteria for passing will be outlined by the faculty providing the lab worksheet. The number of attempts provided to achieve the passing criteria will be outlined by the faculty providing the lab worksheet.

Midterm Block Evaluation 

For each block, students are asked to complete a midterm block evaluation. Student responses are confidential and input is aggregated before the feedback is provided to faculty. Faculty and staff use block evaluation feedback for continuous improvement and students are encouraged to provide respectful, meaningful and complete feedback on our ability to foster your educational development as an adult learner. Failure to complete the midterm block evaluation within the assigned deadline will result in a professionalism violation notice to be recorded as part of the Academic Advancement tracking system. For students with a prior professionalism violation notice, a professional development plan may be implemented. For students currently on a professional development plan, the plan may be modified.

Final Block Evaluation 

For each block, students are asked to complete a final block evaluation. Student responses are confidential and input is aggregated before the feedback is provided to faculty. Faculty and staff use block evaluation feedback for continuous improvement and students are encouraged to provide respectful, meaningful and complete feedback on our ability to foster your educational development as an adult learner on block evaluations. Failure to complete the final block evaluation within the assigned deadline will result in an “Incomplete” grade for the block until the block evaluation has been completed and will result in a professionalism violation notice to be recorded as part of the Academic Advancement tracking system. If satisfactory completion does not occur within a six week time frame, the “I” will be converted to an “F” grade.

Academic Notice 

If a student does not achieve the passing standard on any written examination, Performance Based Assessment (PBA), Clinical Performance Instrument (CPI), or assignment, the student will be given an Interim Block Notice (IBN) by the block leader. The IBN will contain information related to the academic deficit and the student is strongly encouraged to meet with the block leader or designated faculty member for direct feedback on areas needing improvement. The Director of Faculty and Student Affairs also receives a copy of the IBN. The Director of Faculty and Student Affairs may employ the Academic Advancement Committee (AAC) to assist in making recommendations to facilitate student success.

Professionalism Violation Notice

If a student demonstrates unprofessional behavior, the student will receive a professionalism violation notice (PVN) by the faculty member identifying the behavior. The Director of Faculty and Student Affairs also receives a copy of the PVN. The Director of Faculty and Student Affairs may employ the Academic Advancement Committee (AAC) to assist in making recommendations for remediation or further action including but not limited to a professionalism contract. The following criteria will apply to PVN’s: a 1st PVN results in a documented warning, a 2nd PVN results in a 2% grade deduction from the final course grade in the course the PVN occurs, a 3rd PVN results in a 3% grade deduction from the final course grade in the course the PVN occurs and so forth, each additional PVN will result in an additional 1% deduction in final course grade.

Criteria for Advancement 

The Director of Faculty and Student Affairs reviews the academic status of students and makes recommendations for advancement according to the advancement criteria below. The Director of Faculty and Student Affairs may employ the AAC and other faculty as appropriate to assist in making recommendations.

  1. All blocks must be passed with a grade of “C” or better in order for a student to proceed in the curriculum. This includes both didactic and clinical internship blocks. To remain in step with the curriculum, students must complete all blocks in sequence and the time-frame for all students to graduate is five and one-half (5.5) years.
  2. For progression to Clinical Internship, a student must receive a passing score on all components of a standardized patient encounter and an affirmative vote of clinic readiness by 75% of the total core faculty. If a student fails to achieve an affirmative vote of clinic readiness by 75% of the total core faculty on the first vote, the student will be provided the option to participate in a remediation plan prior to clinic entry. The remediation plan must be completed within 6 weeks of the end of the CQM block. The remediation plan will be developed by the CQM block leader, with feedback from core faculty aligned with the remediation areas and in consultation with the AAC. If the student passes the criteria outlined in the remediation plan, the student will achieve a passing grade for the CQM block and advance to clinical internship. If the student does not pass the established remediation plan, the student will achieve a failing grade for the CQM block.

DPT Academic Failure 

A student may not proceed to a subsequent block, if a student fails any block as result of:

  • receives a block grade of "F"
  • has a repeat failure of a PBA, written assignment
  • failure to achieve an average of 70% for written examinations in a block
  • failure to achieve passing score on testing module or lab worksheet

DPT/MPH Academic Failure 

A student may not proceed in the DPT/MPH dual degree option if a student:

  • meets any of the criteria outlined for academic failure of the DPT program
  • receives a MPH course grade of “D” or “F”

Re-Entry Following DPT Academic Failure 

To ensure successful re-entry into the established program curriculum, all out-of-sequence students, will be required to successfully complete an Individualized Academic Preparation Plan (IAPP) to return to the program.

The Director of Faculty and Student Affairs oversees the development of the IAPP in conjunction with the block leaders of the Block to be repeated and the Block(s) that immediately follow in the Curriculum, the AAC, the Director of Student Services, the student, and other faculty/individuals who may be designated as appropriate.

The IAPP will be embedded within the block DPTE 532. The credits received through DPTE 532 are not in lieu of those required for graduation. The total block credits for DPTE 532 will be based upon the required activities and experiences needed to support the student to remediate deficiencies and/or maintain knowledge/skills in order to successfully return to the curriculum and continue academic progression.

If the IAPP is established as a result of a failure for a Full Time Clinical Internship block, the IAPP must include the following requirements: student completion of a graded patient encounter (as included in CQM), a review of academic performance by the ACC, and an affirmative vote of the total core faculty. The student will be required to achieve a passing score of 80% or higher on all components of the patient encounter in one attempt and an affirmative vote of clinic readiness from 75% of the total core faculty, without option for remediation, in order to pass the IAPP.

Failure to successfully meet the requirements and success indicators as outlined in the IAPP will result in a non-pass grade for the (IAPP), DPTE 532 block. This failure will be considered a second block failure and will result in a dismissal recommendation from the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs. After a student successfully completes the IAPP, and the previously failed block is repeated and passed, the new passing grade for the block will be substituted for the original grade so that the student can advance in the program, however, an "F" will remain on the transcript.

Re-Entry Following DPT/MPH Academic Failure 

There is no re-entry to the DPT/MPH dual degree option. If a student fails to meet the academic progression criteria for the MPH program, a student may re-enter the DPT program. Re-entry to the DPT program will follow all applicable DPT re-entry criteria including; all blocks for the DPT program must be completed in sequence and each DPT course occurs once per year. If a student fails to meet the academic progression criteria for the DPT program, a student may submit a written request for consideration of re-entry to the MPH program to the MPH Director.

Criteria for DPT Dismissal 

The Director of Faculty and Student Affairs reviews the academic status of students and makes recommendations for dismissal according to the advancement criteria below. The Director of Faculty and Student Affairs may employ the AAC and other faculty as appropriate to assist in making recommendations.

  1. Achieving an initial grade of "F" in any basic science (BS1, BS2, BS3) or professional issues (PI1, PI2) block.
  2. Achieving an initial grade of “F” in more than one clinical block (MI, MS1, MS2, NM1, NM2, PI1, PI2, PI3, CQM, IAPP) or clinical education block (ICEI, ICE2II, I1, I2, I3) during the entire program.
  3. Failing to successfully pass (with a grade of "C" or better) the repeat of a previously failed block. This includes both didactic blocks and clinical internships.
  4. Dismissal of a student may also occur by a vote of the core faculty for reasons other than those specified above. These include, but are not limited to the following:
    • Failure to meet academic requirements;
    • Infraction of any University rules as outlined in the most recent edition of the campus’ Student Answer Book;
    • Possessing a physical or mental health problem which, after reasonable and appropriate accommodation, still precludes academic progress of the student or interferes with the student's competence or patient safety in the practice of physical therapy;
    • Behavior which displays a lack of professionalism as outlined in the Honor Code;
    • Failure to observe the ethical and professional standards of the Physical Therapy profession as outlined by the APTA’s Guide for Professional Conduct and Code of Ethics;
    • Quality of performance;
    • Actions or behaviors which threaten the peace and safety of faculty, staff, students, patients, or community members.

Criteria for DPT/MPH Dismissal 

A student will be dismissed from the DPT/MPH dual degree option if the student meets any of the criteria outlined for DPT dismissal and/or achieves an initial grade of “D” or “F” in any MPH course.

Re-Admission Following DPT Dismissal 

With the exception of students granted reinstatement by the Dean via the dismissal appeal process, a student dismissed from the Doctor of Physical Therapy program (DPT) is not eligible for re-admission to the DPT program.

Re-Admission Following DPT/MPH Dismissal 

There is no re-entry to the DPT/MPH dual degree option after DPT/MPH dismissal. If a student has met the criteria for academic advancement for the DPT program, re-entry to the DPT program will follow all applicable DPT re-entry criteria including; all blocks for the DPT program must be completed in sequence and each DPT course occurs once per year. If a student has met the criteria for academic advancement for the MPH program, a student may submit a written request for consideration of re-entry to the MPH program to the MPH Director.

Re-Admission Following a WF  

A student with a WF from the Doctor of Physical Therapy program (DPT) in any basic science course (BS1, BS2, BS3) or professional issues (PI1, PI2) block is not eligible for re-admission to the DPT program.

Grievance 

Students and faculty are reminded that appeals are confidential. Candor and professional behavior are expected from all participants.

Appeal Policy 

Only a final grade for a Block may be formally appealed (Formal Grade Appeal) and only on the basis that the grade was arbitrary or capricious. Arbitrary or capricious grading means assignment of the grade was: (1) on some basis other than performance in the course, (2) based on unreasonable application of standards different from the standards applied to other students in the block, or (3) a substantial and unreasonable departure from the instructor’s initially articulated standards.

Individual Component Informal Appeal:

A student who believes a non-passing grade on a particular component within a Block is arbitrary or capricious should contact the faculty member who graded the component to discuss the grade. If the student is still dissatisfied, the student may contact the Block Leader for further discussion and review. Unless a student has been informed that the student may not continue to progress in the Block or otherwise will fail to progress due to the non-passing grade, there is no further appeal of an individual component grade under this policy and procedure.

Block Formal Grade Appeal:

Within 5 days of receiving a non-passing grade which will result in failure of a complete Block and/or dismissal from the program, a student wishing to make a Formal Grade Appeal must first discuss the grade with the Block Leader in an attempt to resolve the matter.

If discussion with the Block Leader does not resolve the matter to the student’s satisfaction, within 5 days of the Block Leader decision, the student may proceed with Formal Grade Appeal to the Chair of PTRS by completing the department Appeal Documentation Form (refer to the Appendix) with a copy to the Block Leader and DPT Director of Student Services. The Director of Student Services or a faculty designee or an appointed faculty designee can be asked to assist the student with this process. Assistance includes but is not limited to advising, setting up meetings, collecting documents, keeping official notes, and other appropriate activities that do not bias or inhibit the process.

If the Formal Grade Appeal to the Chair of PTRS does not resolve the matter to the student’s satisfaction, within 5 days of the Chair’s decision, the student may proceed with Formal Grade Appeal by sending notice of Grade Appeal to the Dean of the School of Medicine.

Appeal to the Dean 

The Grade Appeal to the Dean should be made by forwarding the Department Appeal Documentation Form provided to the Chair of PTRS along with the Chairs decision and any other appropriate updates with a copy to the Block Leader, DPT Director of Student Services, the Chair PTRS, and SOM Student Affairs Director. The Director of Student Services or a faculty designee or an appointed faculty designee can be asked to assist the student with this process. Assistance includes but is not limited to advising, setting up meetings, collecting documents, keeping official notes, and other appropriate activities that do not bias or inhibit the process.

The Dean or designee may dismiss the Grade Appeal if (a) the student has submitted the same, or substantially the same, complaint through any other formal appeal or grievance procedure; (b) the appeal does not allege actions which would constitute arbitrary and capricious grading as defined here; (c) the appeal was not filed timely; or (d) the student has not conferred with the Block Leader prior to filing the Formal Grade Appeal.

The Dean may appoint an Appeals Committee comprised of two DPT faculty not involved in the Grade Appeal and one non-DPT SOM faculty. The Appeal will proceed in accordance with SOM policy, http://www.medschool.umaryland.edu/osa/handbook/School-Policies/Appeals-Process/. The Appeals Committee will review input from the appealing student, the Block Leader, and others as appropriate, and advise the Dean with recommendations for decision and action. The decision of the Dean will be made in writing with a copy to the student, DPT Director of Faculty and Student Affairs, Chair of PTRS, and SOM Student Affairs Director. The decision of the Dean is final.

Student Progression 

  1. A student making an Individual Component Informal Appeal may continue to participate in the current block or blocks, unless extraordinary circumstances exist, such as when a student has been removed from a clinical Block for health, safety or professionalism deficiencies.
  2. A student making a Block Formal Grade Appeal for a Block that is a mandatory prerequisite to a subsequent Block, or where the Block grade is a determining factor in the student’s dismissal from the program, will not be permitted to advance.
  3. A student who is dismissed from the program at any point during an academic year will be required to withdraw from all blocks at the time of the dismissal.

Administrative Provisions 

In the case where a student wishes to make a “formal appeal” of a failing grade and the failing grade leads to automatic dismissal, any appeal to the Dean will encompass both the grade itself, and the dismissal from the program.

Implementation of the results of the Grade Appeal decision will be the responsibility of the Chair of PTRS.

Records of an appeal will be maintained by the Program with student records in compliance with privacy laws which limit the disclosure of specific information in student educational records to those with a legitimate educational interest.

Days are defined as consecutive calendar days. Delays in this process must be for good cause shown. When appropriate, the reasons for delay will be disclosed to all parties.

Leave of Absence DPT Program 

A written request for leave of absence (LOA) is to be made to the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs only when complete separation of the student from academics is desired. For students requesting a LOA, successful completion of an IAPP is a requirement prior to return within the established curriculum. In some situations, return to the program and/or initiation of the IAPP will be contingent upon obtainment of necessary medical clearances. The student must be in good academic standing at the time the LOA is requested.

Leave of Absence DPT/MPH Dual Degree Option 

A written request for leave of absence (LOA) is to be made to the DPT Director of Faculty and Student Affairs and MPH Director only when complete separation of the student from academics is desired. For students requesting a LOA, successful completion of an IAPP is a requirement prior to return within the established curriculum. In some situations, return to the program and/or initiation of the IAPP will be contingent upon obtainment of necessary medical clearances. The student must be in good academic standing at the time the LOA is requested. Students must complete all DPT blocks in sequence and the time-frame for all students to graduate from the DPT/MPH dual degree option is five and one-half (5.5) years.

Participation in Commencement Ceremonies 

The Department will post students for graduation in May only, pending successful completion of all requisite coursework and settling of all financial obligations to both the Department and the University. For those students receiving Financial Aid, an exit interview must occur prior to posting for graduation. Further, no student may participate in pre-commencement or commencement exercises until all coursework has been satisfactorily completed and graduation candidacy confirmed by the Department.

Withdrawals 

Students who wish to withdrawal from the DPT program at any time during the academic year are required to complete, sign and submit to the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs an Application for Withdrawal form. The student must satisfy the authorities that they have no outstanding obligations to the school. The student must return their student ID to the Director of Student Services, remove all items from their assigned student locker, and contact both the Financial Aid Office and the Student Accounts Office regarding change of student status.

Section IV: Student Professional Behavior Policies

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Honor Code and Rules of Conduct 

The Honor Code of the University of Maryland School of Medicine/PTRS is based upon the earned status of all members of the community as effective and committed scholars of physical medicine and rehabilitation science who are persons of integrity and honesty. It places the responsibility for ethical behavior squarely upon each individual and requires peer review of questionable behavior. The Honor Code is an important element in physical therapy education and it is believed that the majority of physical therapy students will conduct themselves in an honorable fashion.

Each member of the academic community is given notice that joining this community voluntarily commits the individual to accept and uphold the values and principles espoused in the Honor Code. Such values do not impinge upon personal opinion or promote controversial ideas, but characterize the obligation of health professionals and scientists to truth, honesty, service to patients before oneself and fairness among colleagues. The individual pursuit of excellence is encouraged but does not permit an individual to ignore the society in which the effort takes place.

In addition, the PTRS Honor Code adheres to the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Guide for Professional Conduct, which “provides guidelines by which physical therapists may determine the propriety of their conduct. It is also intended to guide the professional development of physical therapist students” (Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, Appendix 3, 2003).

The following principles are articulated in the Guide and relate specifically to the student’s professional education:

  • Principle 1: Attitude of a physical therapist toward others
  • Principle 2: Trustworthy actions, truthful communications and confidentiality
  • Principle 5: Responsibility for self-assessment
  • Principle 11: Respect for the rights, knowledge and skills of others

PTRS regards all standards of the Guide as comprehensive and requires students to incorporate these principles in their interactions with faculty, staff, peers, clinical instructors, patients and community members.

Principles of the PTRS Honor Code 

  1. Decorum, civility and respect for others are the foundation of professional behavior and responsible communication.
    • - Each student has the responsibility to conduct themselves in accordance with the principles of the Honor Code. This responsibility includes the reporting of all observed infractions to the block leader, and/or the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs and/or the appropriate class officer, and/or other appropriate person.
    • - Faculty members, since they are frequently in the best position to observe or to receive reports of such behavior, have the responsibility to bring observed or reported unethical behavior to the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs
    • - Behavior shown to lack decorum and/or result in irresponsible actions or communication will result in disciplinary action.
      •     *Disciplinary action for an initial infraction may include completion of a Professional Development Contract.
      •     *Disciplinary action for a second infraction may include reduction in the final grade for the Block by one full letter grade.
      •     *Disciplinary action for a third infraction may include recommendation for dismissal or failure of the block. (Refer to Criteria for Dismissal #3)
  2. Cheating is unethical behavior.
    • - Copying the work of another student during an examination is cheating. Cheating also includes the acquisition of prior knowledge of the examination content by any unauthorized process and the receiving or giving of relevant information during the examination by any means which are inconsistent with the type of examination.
    • - All work given in the spirit of individual initiative should be carried out in the same spirit. No one should report work as their own if others contributed to it or if material produced by others is included without reference.
    • - Reported incidents of cheating will be referred to the SOM Judicial Board. If proven, disciplinary action will be identified by the Board and may include dismissal. (See SOM Judicial Board policies)
  3. The School of Medicine is best served by the reporting and judicial review of all alleged infractions of the Honor Code. Students and faculty who fail to report infractions, or who publicly or privately make accusations of unethical behavior without reporting such behavior to the Judicial Board, are behaving in an unethical manner.

Each student will affirm in writing their acceptance of the Honor Code and Rules of Conduct as cited below. The statements affirmed by students shall be as follows:

  1. I pledge to exercise professionalism, decorum and civility in communication and act in a manner respectful of others.
  2. I pledge to honor the academic confidentiality entitled to all students.
  3. I pledge to maintain confidentiality with patient information and understand that this encompasses my spoken and written communications, including social media and other technologies.
  4. I pledge that I will not seek knowledge of any assessment measure, prior to its administration, by any unauthorized process. Unauthorized process is defined as any method not specifically approved by the Department; it includes the transmission of assessment content to others outside the normal institutional process.
  5. I pledge that I will not give information regarding components of the assessment measure to any student during or after the assessment, and I will not receive information relevant to the assessment from any student during the assessment.
  6. I pledge that I will not reproduce the assessment in any manner for personal use or for distribution to others.
  7. I pledge that if made aware of any information regarding the assessment measure prior to or after its administration by any unauthorized process, I will immediately (within 24 hours) relate this information via email or in person to the Block Leader and/or Director(s) of the DPT Program.
  8. I acknowledge that failure to adhere to the Honor Code and Rules of Conduct will result in disciplinary action.

Physical Therapy is a profession that demands the highest ethical behavior from its practitioners. As a health care professional, the physical therapist enjoys a high degree of public confidence and trust and must govern their professional practice with this public trust consistently in mind. In our society, the health care practitioner functions on the basis of self-discipline rather than imposed regulation. Acceptance of this Code of Conduct represents the student's desire to fully prepare for the obligations of the physical therapy profession.

Professional Behaviors 

All students are expected to:

  • Attend all scheduled classes and arrive on time.
  • Complete required readings and assignments prior to class.
  • Bring all necessary materials and equipment to class to fully participate (i.e. handouts, outlines, texts, etc.).
  • Participate in class set-up and clean-up. Duties will be assigned on a rotation schedule through the block leader and the Academic Services Specialist.
  • Request advance permission to record class sessions from the block leader and/or individual faculty member. Recording of a class session is not permitted unless advance permission has been obtained through the accommodations process via the Office of Educational Support and Disability Services.
  • Notify the instructor prior to class if they have a condition that affects their participation to determine if participation is possible. If direct participation is not allowed, then the student will be expected to observe for the entire lab session.
  • Given the professional nature of the DPT program it is expected that UMB DPT students are dressed in a professional manner to be modest, safe, and in good taste according to the purpose of the session. Students are expected to maintain professional dignity and appropriate personal hygiene. 
  • For clinical experiences, students should follow the dress code specified by each facility. The dress codes may vary from scrubs, uniforms, casual attire, or ties for men. It is the student’s responsibility to find out the proper dress code prior to participating in the clinic. White (hip-length) lab coats, with a student name tag displayed on the left chest panel, should be available for all clinical affiliations and worn based on the recommendations of the facility.

Repeated failure to meet the above expectations will result in the student being placed on a Professional Development Contract.

Class Attendance 

Class attendance is important to academic success at PTRS as such, all laboratory sessions and seminars are mandatory. Certain events are also mandatory as outlined in specific course syllabi. 

In the event of illness, injury or family emergency, the student is responsible for contacting the block leader, and the assigned instructor in advance of the scheduled laboratory session, seminar or mandatory event.  Students are accountable for all work missed due to the absence. In addition, the block leader/assigned instructor reserves the right to require an alternate assignment of the student to ensure mastery of content as part of the make-up plan. Lengthy absences may impact a student’s progression in the program. A grade of “I” may be given until such work has been satisfactorily completed. 

Absences other than illness, injury or family emergency are rarely acceptable and the student should not make plans or accept invitations that would take them out of laboratory sessions, seminars or other mandatory events. Students may request prior approval for missing a laboratory session, seminar or other mandatory event, via a written request to the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs except, absences related to clinical time should be directed to the Director of Clinical Education. Based on the merits of the request, the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs or the Director of Clinical Education may grant the student permission to be absent from the laboratory session, seminar or mandatory event if the cause is deemed justifiable. Examples of justifiable absences include medical appointments not able to be scheduled outside of class hours, jury duty, religious holidays and significant family events (by way of example, but not limited to: immediate family member wedding/graduation/military recognition). Written requests for approval of absence require a minimum of four weeks advance notice with the exception of urgent medical appointments. Students may be required to provide supporting documentation as part of the approval process. If the request is approved, students are accountable for all work missed due to the absence.  A grade of “I” may be given until such work has been satisfactorily completed.  In addition, the block leader/assigned instructor reserves the right to require an alternate assignment of the student to ensure mastery of content as part of the make-up plan. If the absence request is not approved and the student does not participate in the laboratory session, seminar or mandatory event, the student will be provided a professionalism violation notice and the student will be forwarded to the AAC to review and make recommendations on the student’s status in the program.

Religious Observance 

PTRS faculty endeavor to work in conjunction with the SOM Scheduling of Academic Assignments on dates of religious observances. If a conflict does arise, students are required to notify their block leader/assigned instructor in writing about the conflict between a required religious observance and/or a written examination, PBA, or mandatory event prior to the scheduled event.

After the student has notified the block leader/assigned instructor of their need for accommodation, the block leader and the student will determine a mutually agreed-upon date to complete the missed examination. In addition, the block leader/assigned instructor reserves the right to also require an alternate assignment of the student to ensure mastery of content as part of the make-up plan. Lengthy absences may impact a student’s progression in the program. A grade of “I” may be given until such work has been satisfactorily completed.

This policy does not apply to written assignments, as there is sufficient time to plan ahead to complete written assignments. This policy also does not cover participation in clinical experiences or internships, which should be discussed with the Director of Clinical Education.

Professional Development Contract 

Students with evidence of non-professional behavior will be assigned a Professional Development Contract, under the direction of the Director of Faculty and Student Affairs with recommendations from the AAC and core faculty. Failure to meet the guidelines established in the professional development contract will result in a recommendation for dismissal.

Copyright Protection on Education Material 

PTRS students can only use the electronic instructional material provided within the curriculum (i.e. lectures/presentations in PowerPoint format, pictures & video in electronic format, etc.) for personal educational purposes. The use of such material cannot be used in future presentations, lectures, meetings, etc. by students or as graduates from the program. Copying electronic documents and forwarding them to another party is considered unethical behavior.

Access to Physical Therapy Lab Space After Normal Business Hours 

Students are not allowed to enter labs and work on equipment outside of class time without the permission of a faculty member.

To gain access to labs after normal business hours students must:

  1. Contact the block leader or designee of the course for which you are requiring lab access to request permission.
  2. If the block leader (or designee) deems the request is appropriate, the student will make arrangements to sign out a key from the DPT Program Coordinator and/or designee. The student is then responsible for locking and ensuring the space is left in proper working order (supplies/equipment put away, preset lab arrangements restored, etc.). The same student is responsible for completing the key return on the next business day with the DPT Program Coordinator and/or designee.
  3. Students are to contact the following in case of an emergency
    • Non-medical emergency, Campus police at 711 (410.706.3333 if calling from a non-campus phone)
    • Medical emergency, 911 (additionally, please also call 711 or 410.706.3333 if calling from a non-campus phone)
    • The block leader of the course for which you are requiring lab access and the Director of Faculty & Student Affairs must be notified by email within 24 hours regarding any issues that arose during the time period of lab access after normal business hours.
  4. Students will be required to use their campus ID to gain access to the Allied Health Building
  5. Students are encouraged to visit the UMB Police and Safety webpage at https://www.umaryland.edu/publicsafety/ as well as their safety tips at https://www.umaryland.edu/publicsafety/safety-tips/ 

Additionally, in cases of medical emergencies students need to go to the PTRS Reporting of Injury information located on BlackBoard at https://blackboard.umaryland.edu/webapps/blackboard/content/listContent.jsp?course_id=_595_1&content_id=_701796_1 and fill out the attached file at that location titled "ADVERSE INCIDENT REPORT" and include that form filled out with your email communication to the Block Leader and the Director of Faculty & Student Affairs.

Please note that after hours access to other learning space on campus (i.e. Anatomy Lab in Bressler Research Building) is controlled by UMB One Card access. The procedures for after normal hours access to the Anatomy Lab are further outlined in the Basic Sciences I Block.

Student Audio Recording/Video Recording/Still Photography Policy 

Student audio recording, video recording, or still photography of lecture or lab sessions is prohibited. Failure to comply with this policy will be considered a violation of academic integrity and students will be addressed in accordance with the guidelines established for academic dishonesty. Students with University and PTRS approved academic accommodations must comply with the established guidelines provided within their academic accommodation letter.

Section V: Other DPT Program Policies (PTRS Policies & Procedures Manual)

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All other enrolled DPT student related policies and procedures are contained in the PTRS Policies and Procedures manual located at http://pt.umaryland.edu/Other/Policies-Procedures-and-Forms/#SectionV.

Section VI: Student Resources

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Access to Grades 

Students may access their grades through SURFS: Student UseR Friendly System via the UMB Office of Records and Registration: http://www.umaryland.edu/surfs/ 

To access SURFS, enter both your student identification (ID) number (this number begins with @ and is NOT your social security number) - and your personal identification number (PIN). The first time you login to SURFS, your PIN will be your birth date in the format mmddyy. When finished, click Login.

Students should also use SURFS for:

  • Application for diploma
  • Update changes in name, address, or phone
  • Enrollment verification
  • Degree certification
  • Financial aid awards

If there are any questions regarding course enrollment and/or grades, contact the Director of Student Services.

Students may also request an official transcript via the UMB Office of Records and Registration: http://www.umaryland.edu/orr/. Click on Request for Official Transcript. Processing time is 3 to 5 days. There is no charge. Transcript requests will not be processed for students who have an outstanding financial obligation to the University.

Student Procedures for Acquiring Authorization to Complete the NPTE Prior to Graduation 

UMB PTRS student shall submit the items listed below to UMB PTRS via mail, using the following address:

University of Maryland School of Medicine
Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science
100 Penn Street, Suite 115
Baltimore, Maryland 21201
Attention: Nicole Willhide, Director of Student Services

  1. A completed educational authorization form or the identified form required from the state in which the UMB PTRS student plans to enroll for the licensure exam. With the exception of the signature line, all components of the authorization form or other required form must be completed by the UMB PTRS student.
  2. A stamped envelope addressed to the appropriate licensing board, if applicable. Some states require the signed form to come directly from the institution.

    Upon receipt of all materials, the appropriate designee at UMB PTRS will sign the provided form and will place the completed form in the mail or the stamped envelope provided by the student for delivery to the addressed licensing board. Please note, forms will be mailed according to the timeline verification identified on the educational authorization form. For example, if a licensing board requests verification that a student is within 60 days of completion of degree requirements, the form will be mailed as of 60 days prior to graduation.

Malpractice Insurance 

Malpractice insurance is provided via a blanket policy through the University of Maryland state system. The yearly premium for malpractice insurance will be included in the Fall semester student fees.

American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) Membership 

Students of PTRS are members of the APTA, the yearly premium for APTA membership is included in the Fall semester student fees. Please refer to http://www.apta.org/Policies/CoreDocuments/ and http://www.apta.org/uploadedFiles/APTAorg/About_Us/Policies/Ethics/CodeofEthics.pdf for information on the APTA.

Each APTA student member is entitled to:

  1. Attend and participate in meetings, workshops, and professional activities of the Maryland Chapter and the national APTA;
  2. Be an active member of committees of the Maryland Chapter;
  3. Receive publications from both organizations;
  4. Attend the Annual Conference and Combined Sections Meeting of the APTA at student rates;
  5. Be eligible to become a student delegate (one delegate selected from each Maryland school) to the National APTA House of Delegates.

Medical Attention 

Medical attention may be provided by the Student Health Center for minor illnesses and emergency treatment. For more information, visit http://www.umaryland.edu/health/.

Campus Resource Centers 

Crisis Hotline 

Call 911 or 1-800-472-3457: part of the Kristin Brooks Hope Center, is a hotline specifically for graduate students. http://hopeline.com/about-kbhc/ 

Office of Academic Affairs: This Office serves the campus. For more information, visit http://www.umaryland.edu/campuslife/vp/ 

Office of Medical Education 

Provides recommendations and resources for improving study skills; contact the Director of Academic Development at 410-706-7669 or email: sdolan@clc@umaryland.edu.

Office of Student Financial Assistance and Education 

Information and financial aid for qualifying students are available through the Office of Student Financial Assistance and Education.  For more information, visit http://www.umaryland.edu/fin/ 

Recreation and Fitness Center 

The URecFit Center is in the Southern Management Campus Center. For more information, visit http://www.umaryland.edu/urecfit/ or call 410-706-7529.

There are a variety of paid employment positions for students at the URecFit Center.  Positions include office assistants, intramural officials, aerobics instructors and facility moniotrs.  Apply in person by filling out a job application.

UMB Counseling Center 

The UMB Counseling Center offers confidential counseling services to students. Each student can request up to ten (10) free sessions each academic year. In addition, the Counseling Center provides psychiatric and medication evaluations. To access Counseling Center services, students need to schedule an intake evaluation with a counselor. For more information, visit http://www.umaryland.edu/counseling/ 

UMB Educational Support and Disability Services (Accommodation Process) 

The Office of Educational Support and Disability Services (ESDS) coordinates services to assist students with disabilities in obtaining reasonable accommodations through an interactive process involving the student and the school. The website is http://www.umaryland.edu/disabilityservices/.

Writing Center 

Offers workshops on effective writing, conducting oral presentations, and study and career skills.  For more information, visit http://www.umaryland.edu/writing or call 410-706-7725.

Tutoring Services 

Students enrolled in Basic Science I/II/III and Professional Issues I/II, who receive an Interim Block Notice (IBN), are eligible for peer tutoring, if desired and if available. To obtain a tutor, a student must submit a request for tutoring in writing using the Tutor Obtainment and Utilization Form (see Appendix) within 24 hours of receiving an IBN. The completed form should be submitted to the Director of Student Services. Hours for tutoring may not exceed 3 hours per week and tutoring will only be available until the next initial testing event. It should be reiterated that tutoring services might not be available if an acceptable tutor cannot be identified. The student is responsible to resolve any discrepancies between information obtained by the tutor and that presented in class. The student engaging in tutoring services may not hold the tutor responsible for misdirecting studying efforts or incorrectly presenting or prioritizing information. Information shared between the student and tutor will not be held in confidence. Rather, the Department reserves the right to solicit feedback on student progress by the involved parties. Tutoring will be terminated if either party, in the opinion of the Block Leader or Director of Faculty and Student Affairs, deems this relationship to be nonproductive or in violation of the aforementioned responsibilities or Department policies. Students will need to submit separate paperwork each time tutor services are desired between different testing intervals. In the event multiple students qualify for tutoring, group sessions will be conducted to the greatest extent possible.

UM Shuttle 

The UM Shuttle provides the University community with a variety of bus routes that travel to neighborhoods such as Federal Hill, Mount Vernon, and the BioPark, transporting University of Maryland students, faculty, and staff and University of Maryland Medical Center employees to and from the University fare-free. It connects with other modes of transportation around Baltimore, including the Charm City Circulator and MTA buses and trains. For more information, visit http://www.umaryland.edu/shuttlebus/routes/  

Parking 

On campus parking can be arranged with the Parking and Commuter Services Office. Failure to adhere to rules can result in ticketing or loss of parking privileges. Off campus parking is available around the campus.

Student Mailboxes 

Open, non-locking mailboxes are provided for each student. Their designated use is for the return of test papers, assignments, and correspondence from faculty and peers, etc. Each mailbox is on loan to DPT students. The contents of each mailbox are the personal property of each student. Looking through or altering the contents of a mailbox that does not belong to you is both an ethical and Privacy Act violation. All such witnessed and reported violations will be submitted to the Judicial Review Board for consideration. Any materials prohibited by law or are considered a violation of ethical principles are strictly prohibited and, if found, will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

Student-Use Boards 

Each class has a designated bulletin board adjacent to its mailbox cluster. The board is to be used for open-post documents, fliers, photos, notices, etc. 

Lockers 

Student lockers for books, clothing and other personal possessions are located on the 1st and 2nd floor of the Allied Health Building. Lockers are open access; however, once a student has selected a locker, the student must report the locker number to the Director of Student Services. Personal belongings should not be left in classrooms, as they will be discarded or placed in various Lost and Found containers.

Class Officers 

Class officers are elected in the following manner:

First Year Class Elections (DPT-1): Coordinated by Student Services Representative during 2nd week of class in the Fall semester. Officers remain in their position until graduation.

Parliamentary procedures are to be followed for all class meetings.

The following class officer positions will be voted every year:

President
(1 position)

  1. Serves as a liaison between students and the faculty.
  2. Conducts monthly class business meetings.
  3. Facilitates professional interactions between students.
  4. Attends faculty meetings, if requested.
  5. Serves as a student representative to the SOM Council
  6. Attends monthly SOM Dean’s Student Officers Luncheon. You must send a substitute if not available.
  7. Upon invitation, attends the President’s reception honoring campus student leaders. You must send a substitute if not available.
  8. Attends the Annual University of Maryland State of the School of Medicine Address. You must send a substitute if not available.
  9. Meets each semester with the Director of the Faculty and Student Affairs and Director of Student Services to review class activities and concerns. Submits agenda Items at least one week prior to the meeting.
  10. Upon invitation, represents the class at on-campus and off-campus receptions. You must send a substitute if not available.
  11. Ensures that other officers are fulfilling their duties.
  12. Ensures that Parliamentary Procedures are followed during all class meetings
  13. Coordinates class efforts to identify appropriate topics for presentation at PT conferences.
  14. In Year 1, serves as the PTRS representative to the campus Student Leadership Committee.
  15. In Year 2, serves as SOM Judicial Board alternate, if needed.
  16. Coordinates development of the anatomy study guide.

 

Secretary
(1 position)

  1. Takes minutes of all class meetings and within 1 week, e-mails them to the class (dates, events, etc.)
  2. Maintains an electronic copy of all meetings and documents and sends a copy of these to the Director of Student Services within 1 week of the class meeting.
  3. Reviews correspondence with the Director of Student Services prior to distribution
  4. Upon invitation, attends the President’s reception honoring campus student leaders. You must send a substitute if not available.
  5. Meets each semester with the Director of the Faculty and Student Affairs and Director of Student Services to review class activities and concerns. Takes minutes at this meeting for distribution to attendees.

 

Treasurer
(1 position)

  1. Maintains all financial records for the class in conjunction with the Director Finance.
    • Class accounts will be maintained with M&T bank (UMB reserves the right to make changes to the management of student organization accounts)
    • The Administrator will sponsor the class accounts and will be a signatory on the accounts
    • The Director of Student Services will sponsor the class accounts and be a signatory on the accounts
    • The Director of Finance (or staff designee) will reconcile the class accounts in coordination with the class Treasurer
    • Class Officers will be advised that any funds left in the accounts after the class graduates will remain in the bank account.
  2. Requests itemized financial report from the Director of Finance as needed (one week advance notice required)
  3. Director of Finance prepares quarterly financial report and submits to UMB/Finance office.
  4. Upon invitation, attends the President’s reception honoring campus student leaders. You must send a substitute if not available.

 

Student Services Representative
(1 position)

  1. Coordinates the Big Sibling Match.
  2. Solicits the participation of other class members for admissions events: – Group Interviews, Department/Campus Tours, Open House, Alumni Events and Accepted Students’ Day.
  3. Upon invitation, attends the President’s reception honoring campus student leaders. You must send a substitute if not available.

 

American Physical Therapy Association Representative
(1 position)

  1. Serves as a liaison between PTRS students and the APTA and the Maryland Chapter.
  2. Attends all APTA chapter and district meetings (monthly).
  3. Serves as a student Board member (see APTA section of Handbook).
  4. Distributes and collects membership renewal forms.
  5. Upon invitation, attends the President’s reception honoring campus student leaders. You must send a substitute if not available.

 

Athletic Coordinator
(1 poistion)

  1. Serves as a liaison between PTRS students and the Athletic Center.
  2. Organizes departmental participation in campus athletic tournaments.
  3. Disseminates information about campus intramural events to the class.

 

Chair of Fundraising Committee
(1 position)

  1. Provides details of all fundraising proposals to the Director of Student Services and Business Office prior to the implementation of all events.
  2. Plans, organizes and implements a maximum of two major Class fundraisers each semester (i.e., pizza sales, raffle tickets, T-shirt sales, etc.).
  3. Plans, organizes and implements other small-scale fundraising opportunities (i.e., bake sales).
  4. Ensures appropriate use of PTRS logo (as stated in the PTRS STYLE GUIDE) on all fundraising materials.
  5. In Year 1, participates in the planning and implementation of the department’s Pittsburgh-Marquette Challenge fundraising efforts in coordination with the 2nd year class. Solicits participation of 5-6 classmates in coordinating these activities.
  6. In Year 2, coordinates the department’s Pittsburgh-Marquette Challenge fundraising efforts. Schedules planning meetings that include the 1st year class. Solicits participation of 5-6 classmates in coordinating these activities.
  7. Plans, organizes and implements the arrangements for the Graduation banquet at the end of the third year (i.e., venue, invitations, music, program, etc.).
  8. Monitors the spending of funds for the Graduation Banquet in coordination with the Treasurer to ensure that plans for the event remain within the allotted funds.

 

Student Awards 

At the annual Pre-Commencement service and at the White Coat Ceremony, awards are presented to students for excellence in a variety of areas: academics, leadership, and clinical performance. A listing of the Departmental awards follows:

Brian Bainbridge Memorial Award
This award was created in honor of Brian Bainbridge by his mother, Julia Bainbridge ’80 and his sister, Joanna Bainbridge-Blackburn ’94, ’03 to acknowledge his enthusiasm for physical therapy. Students considered for this award should embrace humanitarian ideals and impart compassion in actions and gestures.

Dr. Frank H. J. Figge Memorial Award for Excellence in Anatomy
This award was established in memory of Dr. Frank H.J. Figge, Chairman and Professor of the Anatomy Department, University of Maryland School of Medicine. The Figge Award is given to the student who demonstrated outstanding achievement in the study of human anatomy.

GEAR Award for Geriatric and Gerontological Education and Research Award
This award is given to an outstanding graduate student who has demonstrated commitment to the study of gerontology.

Robert P. Gordes Award
This award was established in 2010 by Dr. Karen L. Gordes in honor of her father, Robert P. Gordes. This award is designed to recognize a student who demonstrates outstanding academic performance with a grade point average of 3.5 or higher, clinical excellence in the orthopedic domain and a strong commitment to orthopedic physical therapy.

Donald J. Hobart Award
This is awarded to a student at the end of their first, and again at the end of the second year who demonstrates excellence in the areas of leadership, academics, compassion, and extracurricular activities. Candidates for this award are nominated by their peers. Final selection is made by an award committee comprised of alumni and former award recipients.

Florence P. Kendall Outstanding Graduate Award
The Florence P Kendall Outstanding Graduate Award was established by the Maryland Chapter of the American Physical Therapy Association in 1979, to honor the graduate who demonstrates overall leadership, academic excellence and clinical proficiency. Students are nominated by their peers to the faculty for a final selection.

Laura G. Levine-Mandell Award
The Laura G. Levine-Mandell award was established by Laurance B. Levine, DDS, class of 1943 UMB Dental School, in honor of his daughter, a member of the class of 1972, to recognize a graduating physical therapy student who exemplifies the care and compassion that typifies an outstanding clinician. Nominees are selected by their peers and recipient is chosen by a faculty vote.

Elizabeth G. Macaulay Award
The Elizabeth G. Macaulay Award was established in 1984 to honor a student for outstanding clinical proficiency. Based on: evaluation outcomes of student performance by clinical supervisors; the difficulty of the clinical affiliation; and evidence of great effort made to enhance one's clinical experience. The Academic Coordinator(s) of Clinical Education (ACCE) and two faculty members select the recipient.

Pekar-Abell Pediatric Award
The Pekar-Abell Pediatric Award was established in 1993 in memory of Alex Pekar and Damon Abell. The award was given for the first time in 1997. This award recognizes a third year student, who has demonstrated through numerous mechanisms a commitment to strive for excellence in the specialty area of pediatric physical therapy.

Phi Kappa Phi
Phi Kappa Phi is a national honor society dedicated to academic excellence. Students who have completed all required credit hours with a grade point average of 3.9 or higher are recommended to the Maryland and National Chapter for selection.

Mary M. Rodgers Student Research Award
The Mary M. Rodgers Student Research Award was named for a past Chair of PTRS, an active participant and strong advocate of clinical research in physical therapy. The award was given for the first time in 2001. The award recognizes third year students who have demonstrated diligence and excellence in research activities and public presentation (platform and/or poster) of outcomes.

Jane K. Satterfield-Care Resources Pediatric Specialty Academic Award
This award recognizes a graduating student with a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA who has participated in a pediatric-focused clinical experience or research project.

Senior Alumni Award
This award was established by the UMB PT Alumni Association. This award honors the graduating student who has demonstrated his / her dedication to the Association through continued involvement, demonstrated by noted participation in various work and activities of the association.

Karyn E. Wade, PT, Memorial Award
This award was created by Ms. Wade’s colleagues and friends at Maximum Performance Physical Therapy to honor her memory and to acknowledge her efforts to be the consummate PT professional. The award is designed to recognize a student who represents the overall qualities and standards maintained by Ms. Wade, namely leadership, dedication, academic standing, compassion, humanitarian qualities and involvement in extracurricular activities.

Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges
Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges is an annual honors program dedicated to identifying the nation's outstanding college students. The program was started in 1934, making it one of the oldest organizations in the country committed to recognizing collegiate achievement.

Section VII: UMB Campus Policies

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All UMB policies apply equally to PTRS students. Since these policies govern aspects of campus life and conduct, students should be familiar with them. All UMB policies can be found at: http://cf.umaryland.edu/umpolicies/, including those related to smoking, substance abuse, use of alcoholic beverages, and allegations of discrimination in areas such as race, disability or sexual harassment.

Section VIII: Clinical Education

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The Clinical Education Handbook is designed to guide the physical therapy student, the Center Coordinator of Clinical Education (CCCE), and the Clinical Instructor (CI) through the clinical education curriculum of University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science (PTRS) Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) curriculum. It is the intent of the clinical education handbook to improve communication and clarify expectations between PTRS, clinical sites, and the students regarding policies and procedures surrounding clinical affiliations, and to improve the efficiency and ongoing function of the PTRS clinical education program. Please refer to the Clinical Education Handbook (located at http://pt.umaryland.edu/Clinical-Education/PTRS-DPT-Clinical-Education-Handbook/) for specific details related to clinical education.

APPENDIX

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Appeal Documentation Form - Click Here for Form on Blackboard  

IAPP Enrollment Form - Click Here for Form on Blackboard  

Leave of Absence Request Form Part One - Click Here for Form on Blackboard  

Leave of Absence Request Form Part Two - Click Here for Form on Blackboard  

Medical Clearance Form - Click Here for Form on Blackboard  

Out-Of-Sequence or Program Withdrawal Student Checklist - Click Here for Form on Blackboard  

PTRS DPT Student Acknowledgement of DPT Student Handbook Form - Click here for Form on Blackboard 

PTRS DPT Student Honor Code Signature Form - Click Here for Form on Blackboard  

Statement of Physician/Healthcare Provider Form - Click Here for Form on Blackboard  

Student Request for Tutor Obtainment and Utilization Form - Click Here for Form on Blackboard